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Spreading Progress: Jefferson's Mix of Science and Liberty

Spreading Progress: Jefferson's Mix of Science and Liberty DemocraticProgress: Jefferson's Mix of Science and Liberty Spreading Professionalism: Sharing Authority in Civic Life Robert K. Faulkner Albert W. Dzur 1. Liberal Civilization, Scientific Civilization Founding the United States meant more than establishing a modern government. It meant establishing a modern civilization. The country prides itself as "A New Order for the Ages," and indeed involves at its core innovation in science, technology, society, and morals as well as in government, law, and rights. It is a country of progress and thus of pervasive transformation. Admittedly, old traditions remained, such as the states and various forms of morals, republicanism, and piety, but just as surely all these were sooner or later transformed. The transformation was intended. It was planned. If one doubts that, it suffices to consider the comprehensive plans and intent of Thomas Jefferson. Jefferson's vast efforts are the large topic of this small essay, which nevertheless focuses upon a part: his account of science and its place.1 This is not to deny the crucial place for politics in Jefferson's reforming and improving impulses, for the key science was his modern political science: the account of natural rights, representative government, and so forth. To miss that would http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Good Society Penn State University Press

Spreading Progress: Jefferson's Mix of Science and Liberty

The Good Society , Volume 17 (1) – Sep 20, 2008

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Publisher
Penn State University Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 The Pennsylvania State University
ISSN
1538-9731
Publisher site
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Abstract

DemocraticProgress: Jefferson's Mix of Science and Liberty Spreading Professionalism: Sharing Authority in Civic Life Robert K. Faulkner Albert W. Dzur 1. Liberal Civilization, Scientific Civilization Founding the United States meant more than establishing a modern government. It meant establishing a modern civilization. The country prides itself as "A New Order for the Ages," and indeed involves at its core innovation in science, technology, society, and morals as well as in government, law, and rights. It is a country of progress and thus of pervasive transformation. Admittedly, old traditions remained, such as the states and various forms of morals, republicanism, and piety, but just as surely all these were sooner or later transformed. The transformation was intended. It was planned. If one doubts that, it suffices to consider the comprehensive plans and intent of Thomas Jefferson. Jefferson's vast efforts are the large topic of this small essay, which nevertheless focuses upon a part: his account of science and its place.1 This is not to deny the crucial place for politics in Jefferson's reforming and improving impulses, for the key science was his modern political science: the account of natural rights, representative government, and so forth. To miss that would

Journal

The Good SocietyPenn State University Press

Published: Sep 20, 2008

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