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Songs and Intellectuals: The Musical Projects of Alain Locke, Alejo Carpentier, and Mário de Andrade

Songs and Intellectuals: The Musical Projects of Alain Locke, Alejo Carpentier, and Mário de Andrade songs and intellectuals: the musical projects of alain locke, alejo carpentier, and mário de andrade Luiza Franco Moreira Paul Gilroy's effort to grasp the cultural and political currents of the black Atlantic finds one of its guiding threads in black music, its social relations, and its circulation in this vast area. The story of the Fisk Jubilee Singers and the complex reception of their performances of spirituals by diverse audiences on both sides of the Atlantic functions as a key example in his critical and nuanced examination of the politics of black authenticity. This discussion, in turn, directly contributes to Gilroy's case for a theoretical model of diaspora that understands ethnicity as "an infinite process of identity construction."1 It makes intuitive sense that a similar focus on music should allow us to extend Gilroy's approach to the black Atlantic beyond the boundaries of the English-speaking world, especially given the vitality, creativity, and global reach of African-inflected musics all through the Americas. That is not as easy as it seems, of course. Still, Gilroy's treatment of the Jubilee Singers provides a fruitful perspective for exploring the opportunities for and challenges of including two other major languages of the Americas, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Comparative Literature Studies Penn State University Press

Songs and Intellectuals: The Musical Projects of Alain Locke, Alejo Carpentier, and Mário de Andrade

Comparative Literature Studies , Volume 49 (2) – May 10, 2012

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Publisher
Penn State University Press
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Copyright © The Pennsylvania State University.
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1528-4212
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Abstract

songs and intellectuals: the musical projects of alain locke, alejo carpentier, and mário de andrade Luiza Franco Moreira Paul Gilroy's effort to grasp the cultural and political currents of the black Atlantic finds one of its guiding threads in black music, its social relations, and its circulation in this vast area. The story of the Fisk Jubilee Singers and the complex reception of their performances of spirituals by diverse audiences on both sides of the Atlantic functions as a key example in his critical and nuanced examination of the politics of black authenticity. This discussion, in turn, directly contributes to Gilroy's case for a theoretical model of diaspora that understands ethnicity as "an infinite process of identity construction."1 It makes intuitive sense that a similar focus on music should allow us to extend Gilroy's approach to the black Atlantic beyond the boundaries of the English-speaking world, especially given the vitality, creativity, and global reach of African-inflected musics all through the Americas. That is not as easy as it seems, of course. Still, Gilroy's treatment of the Jubilee Singers provides a fruitful perspective for exploring the opportunities for and challenges of including two other major languages of the Americas,

Journal

Comparative Literature StudiesPenn State University Press

Published: May 10, 2012

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