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Shaw's Goddess: Lady Colin Campbell

Shaw's Goddess: Lady Colin Campbell "When I got home in the afternoon," Shaw noted in his diary on 17 October 1889, "I did a thing that has been in my mind for some time--[I] wrote to Edmund Yates asking him to give the art-criticship of The World to Lady Colin Campbell, as it is no longer worth my while to do so much work for so little satisfaction, not to mention money." As Shaw was not only the art reviewer "G.B.S." in The World but also, as "Corno di Bassetto" in The Star, the most readable music critic in London, and busy in myriad other ways, he was eager to relinquish what had become a bore. Decades later he would write to Frank Harris, "From Lady Colin Campbell onward, I have been familiar with celebrated beauties and with what is by no means the same thing, really beautiful women." Yet when he gave his art columns over to Lady Colin, he had yet to meet her. A vivid presence, the statuesque, dark-eyed Irishwoman, born Gertrude Elizabeth Blood in May 1858 in County Clare (and thus two years younger than Shaw), already had a column in The World. In the mid1880s she was one http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png SHAW The Annual of Bernard Shaw Studies Penn State University Press

Shaw's Goddess: Lady Colin Campbell

SHAW The Annual of Bernard Shaw Studies , Volume 25 (1)

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Publisher
Penn State University Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 The Pennsylvania State University.
ISSN
1529-1480
Publisher site
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Abstract

"When I got home in the afternoon," Shaw noted in his diary on 17 October 1889, "I did a thing that has been in my mind for some time--[I] wrote to Edmund Yates asking him to give the art-criticship of The World to Lady Colin Campbell, as it is no longer worth my while to do so much work for so little satisfaction, not to mention money." As Shaw was not only the art reviewer "G.B.S." in The World but also, as "Corno di Bassetto" in The Star, the most readable music critic in London, and busy in myriad other ways, he was eager to relinquish what had become a bore. Decades later he would write to Frank Harris, "From Lady Colin Campbell onward, I have been familiar with celebrated beauties and with what is by no means the same thing, really beautiful women." Yet when he gave his art columns over to Lady Colin, he had yet to meet her. A vivid presence, the statuesque, dark-eyed Irishwoman, born Gertrude Elizabeth Blood in May 1858 in County Clare (and thus two years younger than Shaw), already had a column in The World. In the mid1880s she was one

Journal

SHAW The Annual of Bernard Shaw StudiesPenn State University Press

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