Shaw, Murder, and the Modern Metropolis

Shaw, Murder, and the Modern Metropolis Toward the end of the nineteenth century, Britain was confronted by a shocking series of heinous events that not only exposed how the poorest of the urban poor lived--and died--but also how the wealthy classes, in response to the horror unfolding before their eyes, endeavored to conceal their collective guilt. The setting was, perhaps appropriately, the first city of the British Empire during the late summer and fall of 1888. It was a vibrant modern city that was enjoying the fruits of capitalized industrialization and imperial expansion, but amid growing working-class dissension and increasing immigration from impoverished Eastern Europe and Ireland. London during the 1880s boasted a lively political climate in the Parliaments led by William Gladstone (1880­85, 1886) and the Marquis of Salisbury (Robert Cecil) (1886­92), and was further marked by the dramatic backdrops of the 1884 Reform Act (which increased enfranchisement for many working-class males) and the defeat of the 1886 Home Rule Bill for Ireland, which was championed by the charismatic leader of the Irish Party, Charles Stewart Parnell. It was also a time when socialist agitators were increasingly at work, with soon-to-be important voices lecturing and writing for a more just social system in http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png SHAW The Annual of Bernard Shaw Studies Penn State University Press

Shaw, Murder, and the Modern Metropolis

Loading next page...
 
/lp/penn-state-university-press/shaw-murder-and-the-modern-metropolis-BD5Vu0WeEX
Publisher
Penn State University Press
Copyright
Copyright © The Pennsylvania State University.
ISSN
1529-1480
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Toward the end of the nineteenth century, Britain was confronted by a shocking series of heinous events that not only exposed how the poorest of the urban poor lived--and died--but also how the wealthy classes, in response to the horror unfolding before their eyes, endeavored to conceal their collective guilt. The setting was, perhaps appropriately, the first city of the British Empire during the late summer and fall of 1888. It was a vibrant modern city that was enjoying the fruits of capitalized industrialization and imperial expansion, but amid growing working-class dissension and increasing immigration from impoverished Eastern Europe and Ireland. London during the 1880s boasted a lively political climate in the Parliaments led by William Gladstone (1880­85, 1886) and the Marquis of Salisbury (Robert Cecil) (1886­92), and was further marked by the dramatic backdrops of the 1884 Reform Act (which increased enfranchisement for many working-class males) and the defeat of the 1886 Home Rule Bill for Ireland, which was championed by the charismatic leader of the Irish Party, Charles Stewart Parnell. It was also a time when socialist agitators were increasingly at work, with soon-to-be important voices lecturing and writing for a more just social system in

Journal

SHAW The Annual of Bernard Shaw StudiesPenn State University Press

Published: Sep 11, 2012

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off