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Ruptures in Separate Spheres: Deconstruction of Cross-Gender Solidarity in George Noyes Miller's The Strike of a Sex and Annie Denton Cridge's Man's Rights

Ruptures in Separate Spheres: Deconstruction of Cross-Gender Solidarity in George Noyes... <p>abstract:</p><p>This article examines George Noyes Miller&apos;s <i>The Strike of a Sex</i> (1891) and Annie Denton Cridge&apos;s <i>Man&apos;s Rights</i> (1870) as dystopias attempting to depict the ideal of human equality achieved through cross-gender solidarity. The novels&apos; inconsistencies are seen as resulting from an erosion of generic patterns, rhetorical strategies, and stereotypical characterizations as the authors seek to express new sentiments in a cultural ambience still governed by binary thinking and well-established beliefs. The result of the juxtaposition of the fossilized conventions and advanced, idealistic approaches produces a rudimentary form of dialogism where crucial roles are played by the imagery of separate spheres and the concept of boundary crossing, while the notion of cross-gender solidarity becomes the textual dominant of both works.</p> http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Utopian Studies Penn State University Press

Ruptures in Separate Spheres: Deconstruction of Cross-Gender Solidarity in George Noyes Miller&apos;s The Strike of a Sex and Annie Denton Cridge&apos;s Man&apos;s Rights

Utopian Studies , Volume 29 (2) – Jul 11, 2018

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Publisher
Penn State University Press
Copyright
Copyright © Society for Utopian Studies
ISSN
2154-9648

Abstract

<p>abstract:</p><p>This article examines George Noyes Miller&apos;s <i>The Strike of a Sex</i> (1891) and Annie Denton Cridge&apos;s <i>Man&apos;s Rights</i> (1870) as dystopias attempting to depict the ideal of human equality achieved through cross-gender solidarity. The novels&apos; inconsistencies are seen as resulting from an erosion of generic patterns, rhetorical strategies, and stereotypical characterizations as the authors seek to express new sentiments in a cultural ambience still governed by binary thinking and well-established beliefs. The result of the juxtaposition of the fossilized conventions and advanced, idealistic approaches produces a rudimentary form of dialogism where crucial roles are played by the imagery of separate spheres and the concept of boundary crossing, while the notion of cross-gender solidarity becomes the textual dominant of both works.</p>

Journal

Utopian StudiesPenn State University Press

Published: Jul 11, 2018

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