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Ruminations and Rejoinders: Eternal Recurrence, Nietzsche's Noble Plato, and the Existentialist Zarathustra

Ruminations and Rejoinders: Eternal Recurrence, Nietzsche's Noble Plato, and the Existentialist... : Eternal Recurrence, Nietzsche's Noble Plato, and the Existentialist Zarathustra Only rarely do our scholarly efforts receive the engaged and engaging criticism that Zarathustra's Dionysian Modernism (ZDM) has obtained in the three preceding essays. I am honored and grateful that Paul S. Loeb, Martha Woodruff, and Kathleen Higgins have given ZDM such thoughtful, detailed, and largely sympathetic consideration. By probing and questioning the interpretation of Thus Spoke Zarathustra I set out there, they have prompted me carefully to reevaluate the reasons that can count for or against that interpretation. In the pages that follow, I hope to show how much I have learned from Loeb, Woodruff, and Higgins, even where I continue to disagree with them. I will forgo the temptation to summarize ZDM, for taken together their essays effectively outline the book's main lines of argument. I begin with a point-by-point rejoinder to Loeb's critique of the thesis that the thought of eternal recurrence is a "thought-drama" revealed through Zarathustra's thoughts and actions. As a rule, Loeb's criticisms fall short of their mark, for notwithstanding their prima facie persuasiveness they betray an insufficient appreciation for, and practice of, what Nietzsche terms "reading as an art," a necessary http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of Nietzsche Studies Penn State University Press

Ruminations and Rejoinders: Eternal Recurrence, Nietzsche's Noble Plato, and the Existentialist Zarathustra

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Publisher
Penn State University Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2007 by The Pennsylvania State University. All rights reserved.
ISSN
1538-4594
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Abstract

: Eternal Recurrence, Nietzsche's Noble Plato, and the Existentialist Zarathustra Only rarely do our scholarly efforts receive the engaged and engaging criticism that Zarathustra's Dionysian Modernism (ZDM) has obtained in the three preceding essays. I am honored and grateful that Paul S. Loeb, Martha Woodruff, and Kathleen Higgins have given ZDM such thoughtful, detailed, and largely sympathetic consideration. By probing and questioning the interpretation of Thus Spoke Zarathustra I set out there, they have prompted me carefully to reevaluate the reasons that can count for or against that interpretation. In the pages that follow, I hope to show how much I have learned from Loeb, Woodruff, and Higgins, even where I continue to disagree with them. I will forgo the temptation to summarize ZDM, for taken together their essays effectively outline the book's main lines of argument. I begin with a point-by-point rejoinder to Loeb's critique of the thesis that the thought of eternal recurrence is a "thought-drama" revealed through Zarathustra's thoughts and actions. As a rule, Loeb's criticisms fall short of their mark, for notwithstanding their prima facie persuasiveness they betray an insufficient appreciation for, and practice of, what Nietzsche terms "reading as an art," a necessary

Journal

The Journal of Nietzsche StudiesPenn State University Press

Published: Dec 6, 2007

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