Rhetoric, Narrative, and the Lifeworld: The Construction of Collective Identity

Rhetoric, Narrative, and the Lifeworld: The Construction of Collective Identity Alan G. Gross At the beginning of King Lear, at the point of ceding his throne to his three daughters, Lear asks each for a public acknowledgment of her love. Goneril and Regan flatter their father with effusive declarations, but Lear's youngest, and his favorite, Cordelia, refuses to do so: I love your Majesty According to my bond; no more or less. ..................... Good my lord, You have begot me, bred me, lov'd me; I Return those duties back as are right fit, Obey you, love you, and most honour you. Why have my sisters husbands, if they say They love you all? Haply, when I shall wed, That lord whose hand must take my plight shall carry Half my love with him, half my care and duty. Sure I shall never marry like my sisters, To love my father all. (1936, 1.1.94­107) Philosophy and Rhetoric, Vol. 43, No. 2, 2010 Copyright © 2010 The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA rhetoric, narrative, and the lifeworld Furious, Lear disinherits his daughter. Cordelia's speech is remarkable only in its articulation of what Lear should have known; its dramatic impact is a consequence of Lear's reaction to his daughter's argument http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Philosophy and Rhetoric Penn State University Press

Rhetoric, Narrative, and the Lifeworld: The Construction of Collective Identity

Philosophy and Rhetoric, Volume 43 (2) – May 27, 2010

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Penn State University Press
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Copyright © Penn State University Press
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1527-2079
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Abstract

Alan G. Gross At the beginning of King Lear, at the point of ceding his throne to his three daughters, Lear asks each for a public acknowledgment of her love. Goneril and Regan flatter their father with effusive declarations, but Lear's youngest, and his favorite, Cordelia, refuses to do so: I love your Majesty According to my bond; no more or less. ..................... Good my lord, You have begot me, bred me, lov'd me; I Return those duties back as are right fit, Obey you, love you, and most honour you. Why have my sisters husbands, if they say They love you all? Haply, when I shall wed, That lord whose hand must take my plight shall carry Half my love with him, half my care and duty. Sure I shall never marry like my sisters, To love my father all. (1936, 1.1.94­107) Philosophy and Rhetoric, Vol. 43, No. 2, 2010 Copyright © 2010 The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA rhetoric, narrative, and the lifeworld Furious, Lear disinherits his daughter. Cordelia's speech is remarkable only in its articulation of what Lear should have known; its dramatic impact is a consequence of Lear's reaction to his daughter's argument

Journal

Philosophy and RhetoricPenn State University Press

Published: May 27, 2010

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