Revolutionary Conceptions: Women, Fertility, and Family Limitation in America, 1760-1820 (review)

Revolutionary Conceptions: Women, Fertility, and Family Limitation in America, 1760-1820 (review) book reviews a grandmother and "Grand Mother." It reveals Drinker's commitment to her husband and family, her devotion to her unmarried sister and friends, her commentary on infant mortality and other health issues, wartime pressures, as well as exile and the return to Philadelphia of Quaker-loyalists during the Revolution. Crane makes clear what has been omitted in this abridged version of the diary--"stress, suicide, delusions, fantasy, and murder . . . sights and sounds of eighteenth century Philadelphia"--but this only tends to whet the appetite for the unabridged version (xxiv). The editorial note (xxvii­xxix) is important as it shows how a good transcription of a diary ought to be conducted, while the bibliography of printed and secondary sources is an invaluable guide to contextualize Drinker's journals. Each of the four sections of the diary begins with an editorial commentary that sets the scene, and the text is admirably annotated with care to detail and provides full references. The bibliographical directory breathes life into many of the individuals specified in the volume and further contextualises the period under review. I wonder, however, if extra color could have been added by a select number of images for the period, but http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Pennsylvania History: A Journal of Mid-Atlantic Studies Penn State University Press

Revolutionary Conceptions: Women, Fertility, and Family Limitation in America, 1760-1820 (review)

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Publisher
Penn State University Press
Copyright
Copyright © Penn State University Press
ISSN
2153-2109
Publisher site
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Abstract

book reviews a grandmother and "Grand Mother." It reveals Drinker's commitment to her husband and family, her devotion to her unmarried sister and friends, her commentary on infant mortality and other health issues, wartime pressures, as well as exile and the return to Philadelphia of Quaker-loyalists during the Revolution. Crane makes clear what has been omitted in this abridged version of the diary--"stress, suicide, delusions, fantasy, and murder . . . sights and sounds of eighteenth century Philadelphia"--but this only tends to whet the appetite for the unabridged version (xxiv). The editorial note (xxvii­xxix) is important as it shows how a good transcription of a diary ought to be conducted, while the bibliography of printed and secondary sources is an invaluable guide to contextualize Drinker's journals. Each of the four sections of the diary begins with an editorial commentary that sets the scene, and the text is admirably annotated with care to detail and provides full references. The bibliographical directory breathes life into many of the individuals specified in the volume and further contextualises the period under review. I wonder, however, if extra color could have been added by a select number of images for the period, but

Journal

Pennsylvania History: A Journal of Mid-Atlantic StudiesPenn State University Press

Published: Feb 17, 2011

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