Reply to Critics

Reply to Critics John Kekes I am grateful to the editor for inviting contributors to discuss my single explanation that would fit all cases of evildoing. The right book, The Roots of Evil, for allowing me to reply to their criticisms, explanation must be multicausal to recognize the role of each of the and to my critics for taking time to discuss my work. In what four components; it must be particular to take into account individfollows, I refer to the book by page numbers in parentheses to. The ual and social differences; and it must be concrete to specify the primary aim of the book is to understand actual psychological and social condievil, explain why it occurs and how it tions that jointly lead to evildoing. By an evil action I mean one that might be minimized. Its secondary aim Evildoers whose habitual actions meet combines three components: malevois to show why the religious and the these conditions should be held responlent motivation, fatal or debilitating Enlightenment explanations of evil are sible for their actions regardless of and excessive harm inflicted on othinadequate. Evil is the most serious onewhether they believe that their actions ers, and the lack of a http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Good Society Penn State University Press

Reply to Critics

The Good Society, Volume 15 (2) – May 21, 2006

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Publisher
Penn State University Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2006 by The Pennsylvania State University. All rights reserved.
ISSN
1538-9731
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

John Kekes I am grateful to the editor for inviting contributors to discuss my single explanation that would fit all cases of evildoing. The right book, The Roots of Evil, for allowing me to reply to their criticisms, explanation must be multicausal to recognize the role of each of the and to my critics for taking time to discuss my work. In what four components; it must be particular to take into account individfollows, I refer to the book by page numbers in parentheses to. The ual and social differences; and it must be concrete to specify the primary aim of the book is to understand actual psychological and social condievil, explain why it occurs and how it tions that jointly lead to evildoing. By an evil action I mean one that might be minimized. Its secondary aim Evildoers whose habitual actions meet combines three components: malevois to show why the religious and the these conditions should be held responlent motivation, fatal or debilitating Enlightenment explanations of evil are sible for their actions regardless of and excessive harm inflicted on othinadequate. Evil is the most serious onewhether they believe that their actions ers, and the lack of a

Journal

The Good SocietyPenn State University Press

Published: May 21, 2006

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