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Renaissance Medievalisms (review)

Renaissance Medievalisms (review) CoMPARATive LiTeRATURe STUDieS restriction is highly artificial, given the radically different cultural, social, and economic status of poetry between the old english period and the present. From a wider perspective, it hardly makes sense to compare the dearth of praise of heroes in today's poetry against the pervasive auxesis in Beowulf, since--between the heroic sagas sung in the mead hall by the Anglo-Saxon scop and the retelling of Homer by Christopher Logue--poetry became a matter of what burrow terms here "literary taste": a refined, self-conscious, high-culture art form of an intellectual and artistic elite largely, if not entirely, speaking to itself. Simply because praise of heroes has almost vanished from this poetry does not mean, therefore, that it no longer has the cultural presence it once had. indeed, as burrow acknowledges, it thrives in cultural products like film and "popular fiction" that, despite not existing in the Middle Ages, have arguably more claim to analogy with the cultural function of Anglo-Saxon heroic verse. if praise "is no longer a prime function of poetic activity," this says more about the modern institution of poetry than about what our culture is "at home" with. These reservations notwithstanding, burrow's more basic http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Comparative Literature Studies Penn State University Press

Renaissance Medievalisms (review)

Comparative Literature Studies , Volume 48 (4) – Jan 1, 2011

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Publisher
Penn State University Press
Copyright
Copyright © The Pennsylvania State University.
ISSN
1528-4212
Publisher site
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Abstract

CoMPARATive LiTeRATURe STUDieS restriction is highly artificial, given the radically different cultural, social, and economic status of poetry between the old english period and the present. From a wider perspective, it hardly makes sense to compare the dearth of praise of heroes in today's poetry against the pervasive auxesis in Beowulf, since--between the heroic sagas sung in the mead hall by the Anglo-Saxon scop and the retelling of Homer by Christopher Logue--poetry became a matter of what burrow terms here "literary taste": a refined, self-conscious, high-culture art form of an intellectual and artistic elite largely, if not entirely, speaking to itself. Simply because praise of heroes has almost vanished from this poetry does not mean, therefore, that it no longer has the cultural presence it once had. indeed, as burrow acknowledges, it thrives in cultural products like film and "popular fiction" that, despite not existing in the Middle Ages, have arguably more claim to analogy with the cultural function of Anglo-Saxon heroic verse. if praise "is no longer a prime function of poetic activity," this says more about the modern institution of poetry than about what our culture is "at home" with. These reservations notwithstanding, burrow's more basic

Journal

Comparative Literature StudiesPenn State University Press

Published: Jan 1, 2011

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