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Problem of Affective Nihilism in Nietzsche: Thinking Differently, Feeling Differently by Kaitlyn Creasy (review)

Problem of Affective Nihilism in Nietzsche: Thinking Differently, Feeling Differently by Kaitlyn... 90 | JOURNAL OF NIETZSCHE STUDIES works ae ft r 1875 or thereabouts possess no political recommendations. The chapter looks to the colonial ambitions in Nietzsche’s view of migration as possessing self-cultivatory potential. The authors are right to flag a concern about a dark side to Nietzsche’s ambitions here, around this concept of col- ony. Some “quarter of Europe’s workers” should emigrate and colonize to facilitate self-mastery, as a response to capitalism, industrialization, and its diminishing ee ff ct on self-improvement. As Ansell-Pearson and Bamford point out, this romantic imagery of migrating to “wild and fresh” lands is all well and good, but not to whomever happens already to live in those wild and fresh lands. Colony’s promise for self-mastery arguably shows a blind spot to Nietzsche’s teachings for humanity more widely—whether or not he would care is a different story. Although the appendix of letters featured at the end of the volume, trans- lated by Carol Diethe, is of more biographical than philosophical interest, it was interesting to learn from his correspondence that Nietzsche initially wished to call the book “A Dawn,” one of many proposed titles, rejected only because it wasn’t very catchy (252–53). Given his lackluster http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of Nietzsche Studies Penn State University Press

Problem of Affective Nihilism in Nietzsche: Thinking Differently, Feeling Differently by Kaitlyn Creasy (review)

The Journal of Nietzsche Studies , Volume 53 (1) – Mar 15, 2022

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Publisher
Penn State University Press
Copyright
Copyright © The Pennsylvania State University.
ISSN
1538-4594

Abstract

90 | JOURNAL OF NIETZSCHE STUDIES works ae ft r 1875 or thereabouts possess no political recommendations. The chapter looks to the colonial ambitions in Nietzsche’s view of migration as possessing self-cultivatory potential. The authors are right to flag a concern about a dark side to Nietzsche’s ambitions here, around this concept of col- ony. Some “quarter of Europe’s workers” should emigrate and colonize to facilitate self-mastery, as a response to capitalism, industrialization, and its diminishing ee ff ct on self-improvement. As Ansell-Pearson and Bamford point out, this romantic imagery of migrating to “wild and fresh” lands is all well and good, but not to whomever happens already to live in those wild and fresh lands. Colony’s promise for self-mastery arguably shows a blind spot to Nietzsche’s teachings for humanity more widely—whether or not he would care is a different story. Although the appendix of letters featured at the end of the volume, trans- lated by Carol Diethe, is of more biographical than philosophical interest, it was interesting to learn from his correspondence that Nietzsche initially wished to call the book “A Dawn,” one of many proposed titles, rejected only because it wasn’t very catchy (252–53). Given his lackluster

Journal

The Journal of Nietzsche StudiesPenn State University Press

Published: Mar 15, 2022

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