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Potok's Asher Lev : Orthodoxy and Art: The Core-to-Core Paradox

Potok's Asher Lev : Orthodoxy and Art: The Core-to-Core Paradox : Orthodoxy and Art: The Core-To-Core Paradox The epigraph to My Name is Asher Lev, "Art is a lie which makes us realize the truth," a quote from Pablo Picasso, is a kind of metaphor, one of the controlling ideas of the book. The essential conflict is revealed in the first pages of the book: My name is Asher Lev, the Asher Lev, about whom you have read in newspapers and magazines, about whom you talk so much at your dinner affairs and cocktail parties, the notorious and legendary Lev of the Brooklyn Crucifixion. Yet, he went on, "I am an observant Jew." The result is that I am labeled a traitor, an apostate, a self-hater, an inflictor of shame . . . a mocker of ideas sacred to Christians, a blasphemous manipulator of modes and forms revered by Gentiles for two thousand years. Well, I am none of those things. And yet, in all honesty, . . . I am indeed, in some way, all of those things. (1-3) The novel is an explanation, a defense, for a long session in demythology. As Potok once said about Picasso's Guernica, "That's the redemptive power of art. The artist, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Studies in American Jewish Literature Penn State University Press

Potok's Asher Lev : Orthodoxy and Art: The Core-to-Core Paradox

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Publisher
Penn State University Press
Copyright
Copyright © Penn State University Press
ISSN
1948-5077
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Abstract

: Orthodoxy and Art: The Core-To-Core Paradox The epigraph to My Name is Asher Lev, "Art is a lie which makes us realize the truth," a quote from Pablo Picasso, is a kind of metaphor, one of the controlling ideas of the book. The essential conflict is revealed in the first pages of the book: My name is Asher Lev, the Asher Lev, about whom you have read in newspapers and magazines, about whom you talk so much at your dinner affairs and cocktail parties, the notorious and legendary Lev of the Brooklyn Crucifixion. Yet, he went on, "I am an observant Jew." The result is that I am labeled a traitor, an apostate, a self-hater, an inflictor of shame . . . a mocker of ideas sacred to Christians, a blasphemous manipulator of modes and forms revered by Gentiles for two thousand years. Well, I am none of those things. And yet, in all honesty, . . . I am indeed, in some way, all of those things. (1-3) The novel is an explanation, a defense, for a long session in demythology. As Potok once said about Picasso's Guernica, "That's the redemptive power of art. The artist,

Journal

Studies in American Jewish LiteraturePenn State University Press

Published: Nov 7, 2010

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