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On Architecture

On Architecture Bernard Shaw [Occasionally something by Shaw surfaces to provide a new perspective on some aspect of his original worldview. Here is G.B.S. expatiating on ``impressive architecture''--and he is not impressed. Shaw takes on monumental buildings--from Lebanon to London--and figuratively cuts them down to size. Ever the pragmatist, his concern is with ``the health and convenience'' of residents, rather than, quoting Dickens's Joe Gargery, with the ``architectooralooral.''1 This is the first reprinting of Shaw's essay since its original publication in 1938 (London) and 1939 (New York) as the first essay in Twice a Year's ``Architecture Section.'' In this issue one also finds Lewis Mumford's ``Reflections on Modern Architecture'' and Walter Gropius's ``Training the Architect,'' along with essays by other leading writers of the time, such as Marcel Proust and William Carlos Williams. MaryAnn K. Crawford and I are grateful to Sidney P. Albert for drawing our attention to this article and for providing a photocopy of it from Twice a Year. The original is in Mr. Albert's private collection. The essay is item B275 in Dan H. Laurence's Bernard Shaw: A Bibliography.2 Michel W. Pharand] George Bernard Shaw: from Mars Exhibition Catalogue The first exhibition of modern architecture in http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png SHAW The Annual of Bernard Shaw Studies Penn State University Press

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Publisher
Penn State University Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2007 The Pennsylvania State University. All rights reserved.
ISSN
1529-1480
Publisher site
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Abstract

Bernard Shaw [Occasionally something by Shaw surfaces to provide a new perspective on some aspect of his original worldview. Here is G.B.S. expatiating on ``impressive architecture''--and he is not impressed. Shaw takes on monumental buildings--from Lebanon to London--and figuratively cuts them down to size. Ever the pragmatist, his concern is with ``the health and convenience'' of residents, rather than, quoting Dickens's Joe Gargery, with the ``architectooralooral.''1 This is the first reprinting of Shaw's essay since its original publication in 1938 (London) and 1939 (New York) as the first essay in Twice a Year's ``Architecture Section.'' In this issue one also finds Lewis Mumford's ``Reflections on Modern Architecture'' and Walter Gropius's ``Training the Architect,'' along with essays by other leading writers of the time, such as Marcel Proust and William Carlos Williams. MaryAnn K. Crawford and I are grateful to Sidney P. Albert for drawing our attention to this article and for providing a photocopy of it from Twice a Year. The original is in Mr. Albert's private collection. The essay is item B275 in Dan H. Laurence's Bernard Shaw: A Bibliography.2 Michel W. Pharand] George Bernard Shaw: from Mars Exhibition Catalogue The first exhibition of modern architecture in

Journal

SHAW The Annual of Bernard Shaw StudiesPenn State University Press

Published: Oct 22, 2007

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