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Nishitani’s Nietzsche: Will to Power and the Moment

Nishitani’s Nietzsche: Will to Power and the Moment This article reviews the current literature on the relationship of the Kyoto School philosopher Keiji Nishitani to Nietzsche’s writings. In particular, I respond to Bret Davis’s treatment of the relationship between the two thinkers in his 2011 article: “Nishitani after Nietzsche: From the Death of God to the Great Death of the Will.” Through recourse to Nishitani’s treatment of Nietzsche in <i>The Self-Overcoming of Nihilism</i> as well as his later work <i>Religion and Nothingness</i>, I dispute the claim that Nishitani’s eventual dissatisfaction with Nietzsche’s philosophy is based on a negative assessment of will to power. I then show that it is primarily on the issue of <i>time</i> rather than that of will that Nishitani ultimately takes issue with Nietzsche’s mature philosophical standpoint. Finally, I outline a possible response to Nishitani’s criticisms from the perspective of Nietzsche’s thought. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of Nietzsche Studies Penn State University Press

Nishitani’s Nietzsche: Will to Power and the Moment

The Journal of Nietzsche Studies , Volume 46 (1) – Apr 2, 2015

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Publisher
Penn State University Press
Copyright
Copyright © The Pennsylvania State University.
ISSN
1538-4594

Abstract

This article reviews the current literature on the relationship of the Kyoto School philosopher Keiji Nishitani to Nietzsche’s writings. In particular, I respond to Bret Davis’s treatment of the relationship between the two thinkers in his 2011 article: “Nishitani after Nietzsche: From the Death of God to the Great Death of the Will.” Through recourse to Nishitani’s treatment of Nietzsche in <i>The Self-Overcoming of Nihilism</i> as well as his later work <i>Religion and Nothingness</i>, I dispute the claim that Nishitani’s eventual dissatisfaction with Nietzsche’s philosophy is based on a negative assessment of will to power. I then show that it is primarily on the issue of <i>time</i> rather than that of will that Nishitani ultimately takes issue with Nietzsche’s mature philosophical standpoint. Finally, I outline a possible response to Nishitani’s criticisms from the perspective of Nietzsche’s thought.

Journal

The Journal of Nietzsche StudiesPenn State University Press

Published: Apr 2, 2015

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