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Nietzsche’s Political Skepticism (review)

Nietzsche’s Political Skepticism (review) "true to the earth." This is especially the case with Nietzsche's thinking on Dionysus. As Strong notes, for Nietzsche, the attempt by science to "think the beyond" leads to moralism and its characterizations. For Nietzsche, the unsettling nature of thinking is that it continually broaches the infinite dynamism of thought by the need for a more affirmative meaning in the exploration of the beyond, post-God. Vital to this is personality (202) and its role in encountering others. This requires a degree of passivity (204), of adopting the role of a disciple in the presence of a teacher. Strong makes the important point that, in BT, Nietzsche argues against the drive to secularization as well as against religious thinking. What is his third way? Nietzsche suggests that philosophy is ideally a third course between rationalism and irrationalism, retaining something from both that we could call "extrarational." The third way occurs when the teacher sets aside the aloofness of rationalism so that the fright at the unknown is not rigidified into a world-destroying nihilism but, rather, becomes an affirmative delight at the actuality of infinite otherness--reenacting the movement of the tragic experience (205). Overcoming the hubris of being privileged by http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of Nietzsche Studies Penn State University Press

Nietzsche’s Political Skepticism (review)

The Journal of Nietzsche Studies , Volume 35 (1) – Nov 28, 2008

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Publisher
Penn State University Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA
ISSN
1538-4594
Publisher site
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Abstract

"true to the earth." This is especially the case with Nietzsche's thinking on Dionysus. As Strong notes, for Nietzsche, the attempt by science to "think the beyond" leads to moralism and its characterizations. For Nietzsche, the unsettling nature of thinking is that it continually broaches the infinite dynamism of thought by the need for a more affirmative meaning in the exploration of the beyond, post-God. Vital to this is personality (202) and its role in encountering others. This requires a degree of passivity (204), of adopting the role of a disciple in the presence of a teacher. Strong makes the important point that, in BT, Nietzsche argues against the drive to secularization as well as against religious thinking. What is his third way? Nietzsche suggests that philosophy is ideally a third course between rationalism and irrationalism, retaining something from both that we could call "extrarational." The third way occurs when the teacher sets aside the aloofness of rationalism so that the fright at the unknown is not rigidified into a world-destroying nihilism but, rather, becomes an affirmative delight at the actuality of infinite otherness--reenacting the movement of the tragic experience (205). Overcoming the hubris of being privileged by

Journal

The Journal of Nietzsche StudiesPenn State University Press

Published: Nov 28, 2008

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