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Nietzsche’s Dawn: Philosophy, Ethics, and the Passion of Knowledge by Keith Ansell-Pearson and Rebecca Bamford (review)

Nietzsche’s Dawn: Philosophy, Ethics, and the Passion of Knowledge by Keith Ansell-Pearson and... BOOK REVIEWS | 83 Routledge, 2016]; Shilo Brooks, Nietzsche’s Culture War: The Unity of the Untimely Meditations [Cham: Palgrave Macmillan, 2018]; Jeffrey Church, Nietzsche’s “Unfashionable Observations”: A Critical Introduction and Guide [Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2019]; and Andrew Huddleston, Nietzsche on the Decadence and Flourishing of Culture [New York: Oxford University Press, 2019].) Nevertheless, access to these texts remains difficult, even for the most committed reader. This commentary, like the previous volume, opens them up for fresh scrutiny and enhances our understand- ing of them as a glimpse of Nietzsche’s future—and ours: “But I saw the land— [. . .] Great repose in promising, this happy looking outward into a future which shall not always remain a promise!” (EH “Books: UM” 3, trans. Hollingdale, 57). Keith Ansell-Pearson and Rebecca Bamford, Nietzsche’s Dawn: Philosophy, Ethics, and the Passion of Knowledge Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell, 2020. vii + 270 pp. ISBN: 978-1-119-69366-6. Cloth, $49.95. Reviewed by Richard Elliott, Birkbeck College, University of London Although caution ought to be exercised when it comes to his retrospective assessment of his past works, Nietzsche’s EH accurately describes D as a sig- nificant beginning, and a preparatory work. The preparation in question is for a broad critical reappraisal of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of Nietzsche Studies Penn State University Press

Nietzsche’s Dawn: Philosophy, Ethics, and the Passion of Knowledge by Keith Ansell-Pearson and Rebecca Bamford (review)

The Journal of Nietzsche Studies , Volume 53 (1) – Mar 15, 2022

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Publisher
Penn State University Press
Copyright
Copyright © The Pennsylvania State University.
ISSN
1538-4594

Abstract

BOOK REVIEWS | 83 Routledge, 2016]; Shilo Brooks, Nietzsche’s Culture War: The Unity of the Untimely Meditations [Cham: Palgrave Macmillan, 2018]; Jeffrey Church, Nietzsche’s “Unfashionable Observations”: A Critical Introduction and Guide [Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2019]; and Andrew Huddleston, Nietzsche on the Decadence and Flourishing of Culture [New York: Oxford University Press, 2019].) Nevertheless, access to these texts remains difficult, even for the most committed reader. This commentary, like the previous volume, opens them up for fresh scrutiny and enhances our understand- ing of them as a glimpse of Nietzsche’s future—and ours: “But I saw the land— [. . .] Great repose in promising, this happy looking outward into a future which shall not always remain a promise!” (EH “Books: UM” 3, trans. Hollingdale, 57). Keith Ansell-Pearson and Rebecca Bamford, Nietzsche’s Dawn: Philosophy, Ethics, and the Passion of Knowledge Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell, 2020. vii + 270 pp. ISBN: 978-1-119-69366-6. Cloth, $49.95. Reviewed by Richard Elliott, Birkbeck College, University of London Although caution ought to be exercised when it comes to his retrospective assessment of his past works, Nietzsche’s EH accurately describes D as a sig- nificant beginning, and a preparatory work. The preparation in question is for a broad critical reappraisal of

Journal

The Journal of Nietzsche StudiesPenn State University Press

Published: Mar 15, 2022

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