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Nietzsche, Naturalism, and Normativity ed. by Christopher Janaway and Simon Robertson (review)

Nietzsche, Naturalism, and Normativity ed. by Christopher Janaway and Simon Robertson (review) they hardly prove them. For this, we need conceptual, textual, and philosophical analysis. Let me give an example: Nietzsche was in Bonn "appreciative" of liberal-national sentiments, Emden writes (31). He bases this claim on Nietzsche's visit to Arndt's graveyard, in 1864, and his attendance of a speech by Sybel, in the summer of 1865. I have also visited the graveyard of Hegel in Berlin, but that hardly makes me a Hegelian; and I have attended many lectures of philosophers, politicians, and (self-proclaimed) intellectuals with whom I do not agree. This is not to say that the book is not a good study of the context in which Nietzsche's thought developed. On the contrary, it is exactly that. Emden gives an interesting overview of the historical, social, and scientific context of Nietzsche's thought, for example by pointing to Hering and Galton as possible sources of his naturalism (chap. 5), and he successfully paints a lively picture of Nietzsche's social and intellectual life from his time in Bonn to his later "Wander" years. This is not only a laudable achievement but also a much-desired contribution to the study of Nietzsche's thought in its development and context. The book does not http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of Nietzsche Studies Penn State University Press

Nietzsche, Naturalism, and Normativity ed. by Christopher Janaway and Simon Robertson (review)

The Journal of Nietzsche Studies , Volume 44 (3) – Jan 9, 2013

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Publisher
Penn State University Press
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Copyright © The Pennsylvania State University.
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1538-4594
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Abstract

they hardly prove them. For this, we need conceptual, textual, and philosophical analysis. Let me give an example: Nietzsche was in Bonn "appreciative" of liberal-national sentiments, Emden writes (31). He bases this claim on Nietzsche's visit to Arndt's graveyard, in 1864, and his attendance of a speech by Sybel, in the summer of 1865. I have also visited the graveyard of Hegel in Berlin, but that hardly makes me a Hegelian; and I have attended many lectures of philosophers, politicians, and (self-proclaimed) intellectuals with whom I do not agree. This is not to say that the book is not a good study of the context in which Nietzsche's thought developed. On the contrary, it is exactly that. Emden gives an interesting overview of the historical, social, and scientific context of Nietzsche's thought, for example by pointing to Hering and Galton as possible sources of his naturalism (chap. 5), and he successfully paints a lively picture of Nietzsche's social and intellectual life from his time in Bonn to his later "Wander" years. This is not only a laudable achievement but also a much-desired contribution to the study of Nietzsche's thought in its development and context. The book does not

Journal

The Journal of Nietzsche StudiesPenn State University Press

Published: Jan 9, 2013

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