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Nietzsche, Biology, and Metaphor (review)

Nietzsche, Biology, and Metaphor (review) is precisely the kind of "ironic resistance" (107) one must exercise before Nietzsche. To engage with his thought is to wrestle with him, and Pearson's book is an able aid for that task. The Graduate Center and Queens College City University of New York romanexile@hotmail.com, foucnietz@nyc.rr.com Gregory Moore. Nietzsche, Biology, and Metaphor. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2002. 226 pp. ISBN-13: 9780521812306. Cloth. $85.00. DIRK R. JOHNSON Nietzsche's connection to the biological theorists of the fin de siècle was recognized from the very beginning, even though the precise nature of that relationship remained indeterminate. Despite his works' congruence with the many biological theories abounding at this time, Nietzsche's ideas continue to elude identification with any single theory or group of theories. Even his association with Darwin and his ideas is an open question, despite continued attempts to link the two thinkers (the most recent attempt: John Richardson, Nietzsche's New Darwinism [Oxford, 2004]). Gregory Moore resists associating Nietzsche with a definitive biological theory or agenda, but he takes a clear position in this debate: Nietzsche was a nineteenth-century thinker whose thought reflected contemporary theories of evolution and degeneration. Moore's efforts to highlight Nietzsche's affinities with these theorists reflect a trend http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of Nietzsche Studies Penn State University Press

Nietzsche, Biology, and Metaphor (review)

The Journal of Nietzsche Studies , Volume 35 (1) – Nov 28, 2008

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Publisher
Penn State University Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA
ISSN
1538-4594
Publisher site
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Abstract

is precisely the kind of "ironic resistance" (107) one must exercise before Nietzsche. To engage with his thought is to wrestle with him, and Pearson's book is an able aid for that task. The Graduate Center and Queens College City University of New York romanexile@hotmail.com, foucnietz@nyc.rr.com Gregory Moore. Nietzsche, Biology, and Metaphor. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2002. 226 pp. ISBN-13: 9780521812306. Cloth. $85.00. DIRK R. JOHNSON Nietzsche's connection to the biological theorists of the fin de siècle was recognized from the very beginning, even though the precise nature of that relationship remained indeterminate. Despite his works' congruence with the many biological theories abounding at this time, Nietzsche's ideas continue to elude identification with any single theory or group of theories. Even his association with Darwin and his ideas is an open question, despite continued attempts to link the two thinkers (the most recent attempt: John Richardson, Nietzsche's New Darwinism [Oxford, 2004]). Gregory Moore resists associating Nietzsche with a definitive biological theory or agenda, but he takes a clear position in this debate: Nietzsche was a nineteenth-century thinker whose thought reflected contemporary theories of evolution and degeneration. Moore's efforts to highlight Nietzsche's affinities with these theorists reflect a trend

Journal

The Journal of Nietzsche StudiesPenn State University Press

Published: Nov 28, 2008

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