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Nietzsche as Kant’s True Heir?

Nietzsche as Kant’s True Heir? Abstract: In this short article, I present several challenges to Maudemarie Clark and David Dudrick’s bold claim that one of Nietzsche’s main goals in Beyond Good and Evil is to establish himself as “Kant’s true heir.” First, I critique their argument that the prefaces to the Critique of Pure Reason and BGE bear a “striking similarity” to each other. Second, I try to refute their claim that Nietzsche in BGE 11 is “positioning himself … as the true successor to Kant.” Nietzsche does not exhibit the positive interest in the a priori that one expects from even the most minimal Kantian, and his norms are hardly Kant’s. Finally, in my conclusion, I draw some qualified connections between Nietzsche’s normative project and a more naturalistic option within the history of philosophy—namely, American pragmatism. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of Nietzsche Studies Penn State University Press

Nietzsche as Kant’s True Heir?

The Journal of Nietzsche Studies , Volume 45 (1) – Mar 26, 2014

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Publisher
Penn State University Press
Copyright
Copyright © The Pennsylvania State University.
ISSN
1538-4594
Publisher site
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Abstract

Abstract: In this short article, I present several challenges to Maudemarie Clark and David Dudrick’s bold claim that one of Nietzsche’s main goals in Beyond Good and Evil is to establish himself as “Kant’s true heir.” First, I critique their argument that the prefaces to the Critique of Pure Reason and BGE bear a “striking similarity” to each other. Second, I try to refute their claim that Nietzsche in BGE 11 is “positioning himself … as the true successor to Kant.” Nietzsche does not exhibit the positive interest in the a priori that one expects from even the most minimal Kantian, and his norms are hardly Kant’s. Finally, in my conclusion, I draw some qualified connections between Nietzsche’s normative project and a more naturalistic option within the history of philosophy—namely, American pragmatism.

Journal

The Journal of Nietzsche StudiesPenn State University Press

Published: Mar 26, 2014

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