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Nietzsche as Kant’s True Heir?

Nietzsche as Kant’s True Heir? In this short article, I present several challenges to Maudemarie Clark and David Dudrick’s bold claim that one of Nietzsche’s main goals in <i>Beyond Good and Evil</i> is to establish himself as “Kant’s true heir.” First, I critique their argument that the prefaces to the <i>Critique of Pure Reason</i> and <i>BGE</i> bear a “striking similarity” to each other. Second, I try to refute their claim that Nietzsche in <i>BGE</i> 11 is “positioning himself … as the true successor to Kant.” Nietzsche does not exhibit the positive interest in the a priori that one expects from even the most minimal Kantian, and his norms are hardly Kant’s. Finally, in my conclusion, I draw some qualified connections between Nietzsche’s normative project and a more naturalistic option within the history of philosophy—namely, American pragmatism. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of Nietzsche Studies Penn State University Press

Nietzsche as Kant’s True Heir?

The Journal of Nietzsche Studies , Volume 45 (1) – Mar 26, 2014

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Publisher
Penn State University Press
Copyright
Copyright © The Pennsylvania State University.
ISSN
1538-4594

Abstract

In this short article, I present several challenges to Maudemarie Clark and David Dudrick’s bold claim that one of Nietzsche’s main goals in <i>Beyond Good and Evil</i> is to establish himself as “Kant’s true heir.” First, I critique their argument that the prefaces to the <i>Critique of Pure Reason</i> and <i>BGE</i> bear a “striking similarity” to each other. Second, I try to refute their claim that Nietzsche in <i>BGE</i> 11 is “positioning himself … as the true successor to Kant.” Nietzsche does not exhibit the positive interest in the a priori that one expects from even the most minimal Kantian, and his norms are hardly Kant’s. Finally, in my conclusion, I draw some qualified connections between Nietzsche’s normative project and a more naturalistic option within the history of philosophy—namely, American pragmatism.

Journal

The Journal of Nietzsche StudiesPenn State University Press

Published: Mar 26, 2014

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