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Nietzsche as Critic and Proponent of Socialism: A Reappraisal Based on Human, All Too Human

Nietzsche as Critic and Proponent of Socialism: A Reappraisal Based on Human, All Too Human <p>Abstract:</p><p>Against the impression that what he says about socialism is either indiscriminately hostile or somewhat superficial, I show Nietzsche to be a subtle and nuanced judge of socialism in his first three “middle period” works— <i>Human, All Too Human, Assorted Opinions and Maxims</i>, and <i>The Wanderer and His Shadow</i>. First, I argue that the critique of socialism contained within the two volumes of <i>HH</i> cuts deeper than generic dismissals of socialism found in later work. Second, I contend that Nietzsche’s critique of socialism is not his final word, but comes with an equally pointed critique of the “property-minded.” Third, I demonstrate that although Nietzsche diagnoses both pro-socialists and anti-socialists as driven by factionalism, he is not committed to a position of neutrality. Finally, I examine his claim that when economic equalities grow extreme, determinedly socialist policies merit strong support, and argue for the contemporary relevance of Nietzsche’s thinking about socialism.</p> http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of Nietzsche Studies Penn State University Press

Nietzsche as Critic and Proponent of Socialism: A Reappraisal Based on Human, All Too Human

The Journal of Nietzsche Studies , Volume 52 (1) – Mar 3, 2020

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Publisher
Penn State University Press
Copyright
Copyright © The Pennsylvania State University.
ISSN
1538-4594

Abstract

<p>Abstract:</p><p>Against the impression that what he says about socialism is either indiscriminately hostile or somewhat superficial, I show Nietzsche to be a subtle and nuanced judge of socialism in his first three “middle period” works— <i>Human, All Too Human, Assorted Opinions and Maxims</i>, and <i>The Wanderer and His Shadow</i>. First, I argue that the critique of socialism contained within the two volumes of <i>HH</i> cuts deeper than generic dismissals of socialism found in later work. Second, I contend that Nietzsche’s critique of socialism is not his final word, but comes with an equally pointed critique of the “property-minded.” Third, I demonstrate that although Nietzsche diagnoses both pro-socialists and anti-socialists as driven by factionalism, he is not committed to a position of neutrality. Finally, I examine his claim that when economic equalities grow extreme, determinedly socialist policies merit strong support, and argue for the contemporary relevance of Nietzsche’s thinking about socialism.</p>

Journal

The Journal of Nietzsche StudiesPenn State University Press

Published: Mar 3, 2020

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