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Nietzsche's Reading About Eastern Philosophy

Nietzsche's Reading About Eastern Philosophy 010 brobjer (3-36) 10/27/04 12:48 PM Page 3 Nietzsche’s Reading About Eastern Philosophy Thomas H. Brobjer here are some good reasons to believe that Nietzsche was interested in TEastern philosophy. While still at Schulpforta, he refers to it in his first philo- sophical essay. He thereafter became a follower of Schopenhauer, the philoso- pher with most interest in and similarity to Eastern philosophy. In his notebooks and books, he refers to different aspects of Asian philosophy on more than four hundred occasions, and in several of these he claims to be interested in it. In 1875, for example, he refers to his desire to read Indian philosophy, and he speaks of his increasing thirst to look toward India. Such an interest goes well with his inter- est in pessimism and cultural health. Nietzsche also assumes that many of the fundamental cultural influences on ancient Greece and on Europe had their ori- gin in Asia. In the 1880s he frequently compares Christianity and modernity neg- atively to different aspects of Eastern philosophy and he chooses the saying “There are so many days that have not yet broken” from the Rig-Veda as the epi- graph for Dawn. At the onset of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of Nietzsche Studies Penn State University Press

Nietzsche's Reading About Eastern Philosophy

The Journal of Nietzsche Studies , Volume 28 (1) – Nov 29, 2004

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Publisher
Penn State University Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2004 The Friedrich Nietzsche Society.
ISSN
1538-4594

Abstract

010 brobjer (3-36) 10/27/04 12:48 PM Page 3 Nietzsche’s Reading About Eastern Philosophy Thomas H. Brobjer here are some good reasons to believe that Nietzsche was interested in TEastern philosophy. While still at Schulpforta, he refers to it in his first philo- sophical essay. He thereafter became a follower of Schopenhauer, the philoso- pher with most interest in and similarity to Eastern philosophy. In his notebooks and books, he refers to different aspects of Asian philosophy on more than four hundred occasions, and in several of these he claims to be interested in it. In 1875, for example, he refers to his desire to read Indian philosophy, and he speaks of his increasing thirst to look toward India. Such an interest goes well with his inter- est in pessimism and cultural health. Nietzsche also assumes that many of the fundamental cultural influences on ancient Greece and on Europe had their ori- gin in Asia. In the 1880s he frequently compares Christianity and modernity neg- atively to different aspects of Eastern philosophy and he chooses the saying “There are so many days that have not yet broken” from the Rig-Veda as the epi- graph for Dawn. At the onset of

Journal

The Journal of Nietzsche StudiesPenn State University Press

Published: Nov 29, 2004

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