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Nietzsche's Mirror: The World as Will to Power (review)

Nietzsche's Mirror: The World as Will to Power (review) 66 BOOK REVIEWS Nietzsche: A Philosophical Biography is certainly not as groundbreaking as was Safranski’s ear- lier book Martin Heidegger: Between Good and Evil; nor is it as philosophically interesting and rigorous as Safranski’s Schopenhauer and the Wild Years of Philosophy. Still, it gives us a com- pelling picture of Nietzsche as the ethical self-fashioner—the individual “standing all alone at the shore in front of an immense horizon of sky and sea.” As Safranski depicts him, “Nietzsche was the monk at sea. He always had immensity in view and was always prepared to let thinking be sub- merged in the indeterminable and to reemerge with new attempts at configuration. . . . There is no point of arrival in Nietzsche’s philosophy, no outcome, and no end result. There is only the will to an unceasing adventure in thinking” (349–50). Queens College of the City University of New York NOTES 1. Friedrich Nietzsche, Beyond Good and Evil, trans. Walter Kaufmann, in Basic Writings of Nietzsche (New York: Random House, 1968). Abbreviated as BGE and cited by section (§) number. We have generally followed the standard translations of Nietzsche cited here, and the alterations we have made are usually minor ones. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of Nietzsche Studies Penn State University Press

Nietzsche's Mirror: The World as Will to Power (review)

The Journal of Nietzsche Studies , Volume 31 (1) – Jun 14, 2006

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Publisher
Penn State University Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2006 The Pennsylvania State University.
ISSN
1538-4594

Abstract

66 BOOK REVIEWS Nietzsche: A Philosophical Biography is certainly not as groundbreaking as was Safranski’s ear- lier book Martin Heidegger: Between Good and Evil; nor is it as philosophically interesting and rigorous as Safranski’s Schopenhauer and the Wild Years of Philosophy. Still, it gives us a com- pelling picture of Nietzsche as the ethical self-fashioner—the individual “standing all alone at the shore in front of an immense horizon of sky and sea.” As Safranski depicts him, “Nietzsche was the monk at sea. He always had immensity in view and was always prepared to let thinking be sub- merged in the indeterminable and to reemerge with new attempts at configuration. . . . There is no point of arrival in Nietzsche’s philosophy, no outcome, and no end result. There is only the will to an unceasing adventure in thinking” (349–50). Queens College of the City University of New York NOTES 1. Friedrich Nietzsche, Beyond Good and Evil, trans. Walter Kaufmann, in Basic Writings of Nietzsche (New York: Random House, 1968). Abbreviated as BGE and cited by section (§) number. We have generally followed the standard translations of Nietzsche cited here, and the alterations we have made are usually minor ones.

Journal

The Journal of Nietzsche StudiesPenn State University Press

Published: Jun 14, 2006

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