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Nietzsche's Engagements with Kant and the Kantian Legacy, vol. 1: Nietzsche, Kant, and the Problem of Metaphysics ed. by Marco Brusotti and Herman Siemens (review)

Nietzsche's Engagements with Kant and the Kantian Legacy, vol. 1: Nietzsche, Kant, and the... BOOK REVIEWS | 177 Rather than reducing the will to power to individual aggressivity, this idea must at least be understood historically such that it accommodates Nietzsche’s abiding sense that early human existence was “constantly imperiled” (D 18, see also D 23), and that we were the “most endangered animal” in dire need of “help and protection” (GS 354; see also GM II:19, III:13). It is under these circumstances that our will to power initially emerges. It is surely against this backdrop that Nietzsche accepts the ethnological vision of prehistoric humans surviving in a variety of kin-based communities (Geschlechtsgenossenschaen ft ), from the most basic largely promiscuous and egalitarian matriarchal hordes to more hierarchical, patriarchal, and ordered tribal associations. These dif- ferent kinds of kin-based communities can exist at the same time and wage desperate wars with each other for survival. It is only such a view that makes sense of the sudden appearance of those “unconscious artists” who are “orga- nized on a war footing [. . .] with the power to organize” (GM II:17), such that they can take advantage of the less organized, more peaceful communities. Nietzsche seems to think that the primitive Geschlechtsgenossenscha a ft http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of Nietzsche Studies Penn State University Press

Nietzsche's Engagements with Kant and the Kantian Legacy, vol. 1: Nietzsche, Kant, and the Problem of Metaphysics ed. by Marco Brusotti and Herman Siemens (review)

The Journal of Nietzsche Studies , Volume 52 (1) – Apr 20, 2021

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Publisher
Penn State University Press
Copyright
Copyright © The Pennsylvania State University.
ISSN
1538-4594

Abstract

BOOK REVIEWS | 177 Rather than reducing the will to power to individual aggressivity, this idea must at least be understood historically such that it accommodates Nietzsche’s abiding sense that early human existence was “constantly imperiled” (D 18, see also D 23), and that we were the “most endangered animal” in dire need of “help and protection” (GS 354; see also GM II:19, III:13). It is under these circumstances that our will to power initially emerges. It is surely against this backdrop that Nietzsche accepts the ethnological vision of prehistoric humans surviving in a variety of kin-based communities (Geschlechtsgenossenschaen ft ), from the most basic largely promiscuous and egalitarian matriarchal hordes to more hierarchical, patriarchal, and ordered tribal associations. These dif- ferent kinds of kin-based communities can exist at the same time and wage desperate wars with each other for survival. It is only such a view that makes sense of the sudden appearance of those “unconscious artists” who are “orga- nized on a war footing [. . .] with the power to organize” (GM II:17), such that they can take advantage of the less organized, more peaceful communities. Nietzsche seems to think that the primitive Geschlechtsgenossenscha a ft

Journal

The Journal of Nietzsche StudiesPenn State University Press

Published: Apr 20, 2021

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