Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Nietzsche's Doctrines, Nietzsche's Signs

Nietzsche's Doctrines, Nietzsche's Signs Nietzsche’s Doctrines, Nietzsche’s Signs ERNER STEGMAIER 1. Nietzsche’s influence in the twentieth century was based mostly on his doc- trines (“Lehren”). After a hundred years of research, the sense and coherence of these doctrines are not yet clear. Therefore, Nietzsche’s philosophy is regarded by now as incurably contradictory or ambivalent. Contradiction and ambiva- lence have become the trademark of Nietzsche’s philosophy. Nietzsche’s doctrines of the death of God or of Nihilism, of the Will to Power, of the Overman, and the Eternal Recurrence of the Same, are among the most powerful doctrines European philosophy has hitherto produced. They include a critique of metaphysics more severe than any before, a critique of morals more severe than any before, and a critique of logic more radical than any before. Together, as Nietzsche himself claimed more and more insistently, they make the sharpest of cuts into Occidental thinking from Plato onward. Each of these doctrines seemed to be in itself easily understandable. In their outlines they have been understood like this: 1.1. According to Nietzsche’s doctrine of “the death of God” or “nihilism,” the supreme values of European thinking—in particular, the values of an absolute Truth, Goodness, and Beauty, the unity of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of Nietzsche Studies Penn State University Press

Nietzsche's Doctrines, Nietzsche's Signs

The Journal of Nietzsche Studies , Volume 31 (1) – Jun 14, 2006

Loading next page...
 
/lp/penn-state-university-press/nietzsche-apos-s-doctrines-nietzsche-apos-s-signs-6OpkccWsNe
Publisher
Penn State University Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2006 The Pennsylvania State University.
ISSN
1538-4594

Abstract

Nietzsche’s Doctrines, Nietzsche’s Signs ERNER STEGMAIER 1. Nietzsche’s influence in the twentieth century was based mostly on his doc- trines (“Lehren”). After a hundred years of research, the sense and coherence of these doctrines are not yet clear. Therefore, Nietzsche’s philosophy is regarded by now as incurably contradictory or ambivalent. Contradiction and ambiva- lence have become the trademark of Nietzsche’s philosophy. Nietzsche’s doctrines of the death of God or of Nihilism, of the Will to Power, of the Overman, and the Eternal Recurrence of the Same, are among the most powerful doctrines European philosophy has hitherto produced. They include a critique of metaphysics more severe than any before, a critique of morals more severe than any before, and a critique of logic more radical than any before. Together, as Nietzsche himself claimed more and more insistently, they make the sharpest of cuts into Occidental thinking from Plato onward. Each of these doctrines seemed to be in itself easily understandable. In their outlines they have been understood like this: 1.1. According to Nietzsche’s doctrine of “the death of God” or “nihilism,” the supreme values of European thinking—in particular, the values of an absolute Truth, Goodness, and Beauty, the unity of

Journal

The Journal of Nietzsche StudiesPenn State University Press

Published: Jun 14, 2006

There are no references for this article.