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Nietzsche and Zion (review)

Nietzsche and Zion (review) BOOK REVIEWS 71 One might ask again how new this all is. Calls for subversive twists against hegemonic power have been platitudes for twenty years. But in politics there are greater virtues than originality. Grosz poses a challenge that political commitment in the wake of Marxism must confront: to rethink what “future” means before working toward any given future. Perhaps the clearest sign of her book’s value is that even a vastly different book—interpreting other authors with another method—will still have to ask her question: What new understanding of time will permit one to hope for a new time of understanding? City College and The Graduate Center Jacob Golomb. Nietzsche and Zion. Ithaca and London: Cornell University Press, 2004. xii + 274 pp. $39.95. ISBN 0-8014-3762-8. RITCHIE ROBERTSON It should surprise nobody that many early thinkers associated with the Zionist movement took a strong interest in Nietzsche. Whether they were brought up amid Western European culture, like Max Nordau, or reached it by breaking away from the traditional Jewish culture of Eastern Europe, like Micha Josef Berdichevski, they could not fail to register the overwhelming presence of Nietzsche’s thought, especially after 1890. As Steven Aschheim has comprehensively shown in http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of Nietzsche Studies Penn State University Press

Nietzsche and Zion (review)

The Journal of Nietzsche Studies , Volume 31 (1) – Jun 14, 2006

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Publisher
Penn State University Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2006 The Pennsylvania State University.
ISSN
1538-4594

Abstract

BOOK REVIEWS 71 One might ask again how new this all is. Calls for subversive twists against hegemonic power have been platitudes for twenty years. But in politics there are greater virtues than originality. Grosz poses a challenge that political commitment in the wake of Marxism must confront: to rethink what “future” means before working toward any given future. Perhaps the clearest sign of her book’s value is that even a vastly different book—interpreting other authors with another method—will still have to ask her question: What new understanding of time will permit one to hope for a new time of understanding? City College and The Graduate Center Jacob Golomb. Nietzsche and Zion. Ithaca and London: Cornell University Press, 2004. xii + 274 pp. $39.95. ISBN 0-8014-3762-8. RITCHIE ROBERTSON It should surprise nobody that many early thinkers associated with the Zionist movement took a strong interest in Nietzsche. Whether they were brought up amid Western European culture, like Max Nordau, or reached it by breaking away from the traditional Jewish culture of Eastern Europe, like Micha Josef Berdichevski, they could not fail to register the overwhelming presence of Nietzsche’s thought, especially after 1890. As Steven Aschheim has comprehensively shown in

Journal

The Journal of Nietzsche StudiesPenn State University Press

Published: Jun 14, 2006

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