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Nietzsche and the Transcendental Tradition (review)

Nietzsche and the Transcendental Tradition (review) Book Reviews Michael Steven Green. Nietzsche and the Transcendental Tradition. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 2002. 216 pp. ISBN 10: 0252027353. Cloth, $29.95. R. KEVIN HILL As the title of the book suggests, Michael Green reads Nietzsche as deeply embedded in Kantian and Neo-Kantian patterns of assumption and argument. The argument proceeds in two stages. The first stage is to show this textually by tracing many of Nietzsche's characteristic philosophical concerns to his early encounter with the Neo-Kantian Afrikan Spir. Though one could argue from the same evidence that other Neo-Kantians, e.g., Kuno Fischer and Friedrich Lange, are equally important in shaping Nietzsche's thought (and a thorough historical study of this sort, which to my knowledge has not yet been attempted, would be a welcome addition to the Nietzsche literature), Green's emphasis on Spir is far from misplaced, for it is from Spir that Nietzsche appropriated arguments against the transcendental ideality of time (along with much else besides) and on the basis of which Nietzsche made his first move from a kind of transcendental idealism to the naturalism that would characterize his thought from this point forward. Green also argues that naturalism, when combined with a Kantian epistemology http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of Nietzsche Studies Penn State University Press

Nietzsche and the Transcendental Tradition (review)

The Journal of Nietzsche Studies , Volume 39 (1) – May 30, 2010

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Penn State University Press
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Copyright © Penn State University Press
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1538-4594
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Abstract

Book Reviews Michael Steven Green. Nietzsche and the Transcendental Tradition. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 2002. 216 pp. ISBN 10: 0252027353. Cloth, $29.95. R. KEVIN HILL As the title of the book suggests, Michael Green reads Nietzsche as deeply embedded in Kantian and Neo-Kantian patterns of assumption and argument. The argument proceeds in two stages. The first stage is to show this textually by tracing many of Nietzsche's characteristic philosophical concerns to his early encounter with the Neo-Kantian Afrikan Spir. Though one could argue from the same evidence that other Neo-Kantians, e.g., Kuno Fischer and Friedrich Lange, are equally important in shaping Nietzsche's thought (and a thorough historical study of this sort, which to my knowledge has not yet been attempted, would be a welcome addition to the Nietzsche literature), Green's emphasis on Spir is far from misplaced, for it is from Spir that Nietzsche appropriated arguments against the transcendental ideality of time (along with much else besides) and on the basis of which Nietzsche made his first move from a kind of transcendental idealism to the naturalism that would characterize his thought from this point forward. Green also argues that naturalism, when combined with a Kantian epistemology

Journal

The Journal of Nietzsche StudiesPenn State University Press

Published: May 30, 2010

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