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Nietzsche and the Political (review)

Nietzsche and the Political (review) BOOK REVIEWS Europe. Only through the people calling for a poet can the gods return and interpose themselves between humanity and technology, as Heidegger suggested. Self-criticism is the fitting theme of much of Nietzsche's poetry, casting doubt on the usefulness of poetic work. In this respect it is interesting to compare Nietzsche's "The poet's profession" with Hölderlin's "The Poet's Vocation," which would indicate that Nietzsche's earlier views had changed considerably by this time. Hölderlin embraces the theme of the poet as the servant of Bacchus, whereas Nietzsche seems to suggest that his poetry is a dubious habit picked up in youth, which he should have grown out of but enjoys too much. Indeed, his whole rhetoric concerning songs and singing could be an attempt to justify this pleasure. This ambivalence balances the exhortatory nature of much of Nietzsche's other writing--that which is often found to be "affirmative." However, I would like to suggest that it is in the poetry that the affirmative vision is actually formed. The uncertainty expressed in the poetry, coupled with a certain pleasure at the deprecation of self and other, is a more valid expression of the requirement for hesitancy and caution that Nietzsche http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of Nietzsche Studies Penn State University Press

Nietzsche and the Political (review)

The Journal of Nietzsche Studies , Volume 35 (1) – Nov 28, 2008

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Publisher
Penn State University Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA
ISSN
1538-4594
Publisher site
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Abstract

BOOK REVIEWS Europe. Only through the people calling for a poet can the gods return and interpose themselves between humanity and technology, as Heidegger suggested. Self-criticism is the fitting theme of much of Nietzsche's poetry, casting doubt on the usefulness of poetic work. In this respect it is interesting to compare Nietzsche's "The poet's profession" with Hölderlin's "The Poet's Vocation," which would indicate that Nietzsche's earlier views had changed considerably by this time. Hölderlin embraces the theme of the poet as the servant of Bacchus, whereas Nietzsche seems to suggest that his poetry is a dubious habit picked up in youth, which he should have grown out of but enjoys too much. Indeed, his whole rhetoric concerning songs and singing could be an attempt to justify this pleasure. This ambivalence balances the exhortatory nature of much of Nietzsche's other writing--that which is often found to be "affirmative." However, I would like to suggest that it is in the poetry that the affirmative vision is actually formed. The uncertainty expressed in the poetry, coupled with a certain pleasure at the deprecation of self and other, is a more valid expression of the requirement for hesitancy and caution that Nietzsche

Journal

The Journal of Nietzsche StudiesPenn State University Press

Published: Nov 28, 2008

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