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Nietzsche and Science (review)

Nietzsche and Science (review) reason he was inspired by Bourget, who had used the term in an essay on Baudelaire (120). Nietzsche's fight, now, was no longer against Christianity and morality per se but against "morbid" expressions of Christianity in the culture of the fin de siècle (Wagner, Baudelaire, Tolstoy, Ibsen, etc.). Nietzsche employs three relevant rhetorical strategies in this final stage. First, he uses the language of décadence to fight against the décadents. In the ultimate ironic move, Nietzsche uses the theories and terminology of the degenerationists to expose Wagner and his circle as the décadents par excellence. Thus, Nietzsche, realizing that Wagner's keenest backers and supporters were adherents of these racial theories, turned the tables on them and implicated them in their own theories. Second, Nietzsche preempted their eventual attack by "outing" himself as a décadent. By arguing that he, as a décadent, understood décadence in all its manifestations, Nietzsche not only reinforced his own expertise on the subject; he effectively neutralized the critique later directed against him. Finally, Nietzsche, ever the consummate stylist, was keen to prove that, even in matters of style, he could out-décadent the decadents. Bettina Wahrig-Schmidt has shown that the insertion of scientific discursive elements http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of Nietzsche Studies Penn State University Press

Nietzsche and Science (review)

The Journal of Nietzsche Studies , Volume 35 (1) – Nov 28, 2008

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Publisher
Penn State University Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA
ISSN
1538-4594
Publisher site
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Abstract

reason he was inspired by Bourget, who had used the term in an essay on Baudelaire (120). Nietzsche's fight, now, was no longer against Christianity and morality per se but against "morbid" expressions of Christianity in the culture of the fin de siècle (Wagner, Baudelaire, Tolstoy, Ibsen, etc.). Nietzsche employs three relevant rhetorical strategies in this final stage. First, he uses the language of décadence to fight against the décadents. In the ultimate ironic move, Nietzsche uses the theories and terminology of the degenerationists to expose Wagner and his circle as the décadents par excellence. Thus, Nietzsche, realizing that Wagner's keenest backers and supporters were adherents of these racial theories, turned the tables on them and implicated them in their own theories. Second, Nietzsche preempted their eventual attack by "outing" himself as a décadent. By arguing that he, as a décadent, understood décadence in all its manifestations, Nietzsche not only reinforced his own expertise on the subject; he effectively neutralized the critique later directed against him. Finally, Nietzsche, ever the consummate stylist, was keen to prove that, even in matters of style, he could out-décadent the decadents. Bettina Wahrig-Schmidt has shown that the insertion of scientific discursive elements

Journal

The Journal of Nietzsche StudiesPenn State University Press

Published: Nov 28, 2008

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