Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Nietzsche: A Philosophical Biography (review)

Nietzsche: A Philosophical Biography (review) Rüdiger Safranski. Nietzsche: A Philosophical Biography, trans. Shelly Frisch. New York and London: W. W. Norton, 2002. 412 pp. STEVEN V. HICKS AND ALAN ROSENBERG In Beyond Good and Evil, Nietzsche writes that "gradually it has become clear to me what every great philosophy so far has been: namely, the personal confession of its author and a kind of involuntary and unconscious memoir" (BGE, § 6).1 In a letter to Brandes dated 10 April 1888, Nietzsche also writes, "the person who does not find himself addressed personally by [my] work will probably have nothing more to do with me."2 Perhaps more than any other philosopher of the modern period, Nietzsche invites the kind of "highly personal" Biographie seines Denkens that Rüdiger Safranski offers in his crisply written Nietzsche: A Philosophical Biography.As the translator, Shelly Frisch rightly notes in her preface to the English edition, that "Safranski excels at the art of philosophical narration" (14). With a graceful and eloquent narrative, he weaves together "subtle, yet riveting, descriptions of the major junctures in Nietzsche's life that served to mark turning points in his [Nietzsche's] philosophical orientation" (14). Moreover, Safranski brings "the facts of [Nietzsche's] life" to bear on the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of Nietzsche Studies Penn State University Press

Nietzsche: A Philosophical Biography (review)

The Journal of Nietzsche Studies , Volume 31 (1) – Jun 14, 2006

Loading next page...
 
/lp/penn-state-university-press/nietzsche-a-philosophical-biography-review-Pgj0HoLONn
Publisher
Penn State University Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2006 by The Pennsylvania State University.
ISSN
1538-4594
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Rüdiger Safranski. Nietzsche: A Philosophical Biography, trans. Shelly Frisch. New York and London: W. W. Norton, 2002. 412 pp. STEVEN V. HICKS AND ALAN ROSENBERG In Beyond Good and Evil, Nietzsche writes that "gradually it has become clear to me what every great philosophy so far has been: namely, the personal confession of its author and a kind of involuntary and unconscious memoir" (BGE, § 6).1 In a letter to Brandes dated 10 April 1888, Nietzsche also writes, "the person who does not find himself addressed personally by [my] work will probably have nothing more to do with me."2 Perhaps more than any other philosopher of the modern period, Nietzsche invites the kind of "highly personal" Biographie seines Denkens that Rüdiger Safranski offers in his crisply written Nietzsche: A Philosophical Biography.As the translator, Shelly Frisch rightly notes in her preface to the English edition, that "Safranski excels at the art of philosophical narration" (14). With a graceful and eloquent narrative, he weaves together "subtle, yet riveting, descriptions of the major junctures in Nietzsche's life that served to mark turning points in his [Nietzsche's] philosophical orientation" (14). Moreover, Safranski brings "the facts of [Nietzsche's] life" to bear on the

Journal

The Journal of Nietzsche StudiesPenn State University Press

Published: Jun 14, 2006

There are no references for this article.