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“New Year’s Dream”: A Chinese Anarcho-cosmopolitan Utopia

“New Year’s Dream”: A Chinese Anarcho-cosmopolitan Utopia Abstract: This article is an in-depth analysis of “New Year’s Dream” (1904), a utopian story by Cai Yuanpei, one of the most prominent Chinese intellectuals in the twentieth century. In combination with the story’s late Qing milieu, it explores how Cai Yuanpei maps his contemporary world and designs a better one. Based on detailed discussions of the linear progressive future history in the story, this article values “New Year’s Dream” for its landmark importance in the transition of Chinese utopian thought and critically analyzes its theme of dual revolution—a national revolution leading to a world revolution, which is significant for our understanding of world utopianism and anarchism. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Utopian Studies Penn State University Press

“New Year’s Dream”: A Chinese Anarcho-cosmopolitan Utopia

Utopian Studies , Volume 24 (1) – Apr 28, 2013

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Publisher
Penn State University Press
Copyright
Copyright © Society for Utopian Studies
ISSN
2154-9648
Publisher site
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Abstract

Abstract: This article is an in-depth analysis of “New Year’s Dream” (1904), a utopian story by Cai Yuanpei, one of the most prominent Chinese intellectuals in the twentieth century. In combination with the story’s late Qing milieu, it explores how Cai Yuanpei maps his contemporary world and designs a better one. Based on detailed discussions of the linear progressive future history in the story, this article values “New Year’s Dream” for its landmark importance in the transition of Chinese utopian thought and critically analyzes its theme of dual revolution—a national revolution leading to a world revolution, which is significant for our understanding of world utopianism and anarchism.

Journal

Utopian StudiesPenn State University Press

Published: Apr 28, 2013

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