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Mrs. Warren's Profession in China: Factors in Cross-Cultural Adaptations

Mrs. Warren's Profession in China: Factors in Cross-Cultural Adaptations Kay Li : FACTORS IN CROSS-CULTURAL ADAPTATIONS1 The failure of the first productions of Shaw's plays in China--performances of Mrs Warren's Profession--in October 1920 by the New Shanghai Theatre, had a far-reaching influence on modern Chinese drama. The producer, Wang Chung-hsien, reflecting on the failure, argued that the performances drew attention to the need for new adaptations in Chinese drama to accommodate China's new sociocultural ideals and the needs of a Chinese audience. Writing in his "Youyou Shi Jutan" ("Wang Chung-hsien on Drama"), he explains that the first Chinese production of Mrs Warren's Profession was, in a narrow sense, the first encounter between purely realist Western drama and Chinese society and, in a broad sense, the first meeting between new culture drama and Chinese society.2 Thus, the production had the task of bridging not only Eastern and Western dramatic forms but also the East and the West as geopolitical and cultural entities, linking the traditional and the modern, art and everyday life, in Chinese society. It also gave some clues to how Shaw's play in particular, and Western plays in general, could be adapted to China. After the failure of the first productions of Mrs Warren's Profession, some http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png SHAW The Annual of Bernard Shaw Studies Penn State University Press

Mrs. Warren's Profession in China: Factors in Cross-Cultural Adaptations

SHAW The Annual of Bernard Shaw Studies , Volume 25 (1)

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Publisher
Penn State University Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 The Pennsylvania State University.
ISSN
1529-1480
Publisher site
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Abstract

Kay Li : FACTORS IN CROSS-CULTURAL ADAPTATIONS1 The failure of the first productions of Shaw's plays in China--performances of Mrs Warren's Profession--in October 1920 by the New Shanghai Theatre, had a far-reaching influence on modern Chinese drama. The producer, Wang Chung-hsien, reflecting on the failure, argued that the performances drew attention to the need for new adaptations in Chinese drama to accommodate China's new sociocultural ideals and the needs of a Chinese audience. Writing in his "Youyou Shi Jutan" ("Wang Chung-hsien on Drama"), he explains that the first Chinese production of Mrs Warren's Profession was, in a narrow sense, the first encounter between purely realist Western drama and Chinese society and, in a broad sense, the first meeting between new culture drama and Chinese society.2 Thus, the production had the task of bridging not only Eastern and Western dramatic forms but also the East and the West as geopolitical and cultural entities, linking the traditional and the modern, art and everyday life, in Chinese society. It also gave some clues to how Shaw's play in particular, and Western plays in general, could be adapted to China. After the failure of the first productions of Mrs Warren's Profession, some

Journal

SHAW The Annual of Bernard Shaw StudiesPenn State University Press

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