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"More Looked at than Listened To": Shaw on the Prerevolutionary Russian Stage

"More Looked at than Listened To": Shaw on the Prerevolutionary Russian Stage The year 1905 opened disastrously for Russia with a humiliating defeat in its war with Japan and with the assassination of the governor-general of Moscow. It went on through widespread strikes, bloody pogroms, and uprisings as bloodily put down, culminating in an abortive Revolution that did succeed in instituting a parliamentary Duma. The year 1905 also marked the start of the Silver Age of Russian art, literature, and theater, the year when Stanislavsky appointed Vsevolod Meyerhold to create an experimental studio to explore new approaches to acting, when Pavel Gaideburov and his wife founded the Itinerant Theater to bring high culture to the masses. And in 1905 the most popular British playwright on the Russian stage was Jerome K. Jerome. Today remembered chiefly as the author of Three Men in a Boat (Not to Mention the Dog), Jerome was a leading exponent of the so-called New Humor, grounded in irreverence, iconoclasm, and a knowing use of slang. Russians considered him the epitome of British wit, by which they meant a certain poker-faced, understated sense of the absurd. He is even quoted in Chekhov's Seagull. Jerome plays a great deal with many of the same social concerns as do http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png SHAW The Annual of Bernard Shaw Studies Penn State University Press

"More Looked at than Listened To": Shaw on the Prerevolutionary Russian Stage

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Publisher
Penn State University Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2007 The Pennsylvania State University. All rights reserved.
ISSN
1529-1480
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Abstract

The year 1905 opened disastrously for Russia with a humiliating defeat in its war with Japan and with the assassination of the governor-general of Moscow. It went on through widespread strikes, bloody pogroms, and uprisings as bloodily put down, culminating in an abortive Revolution that did succeed in instituting a parliamentary Duma. The year 1905 also marked the start of the Silver Age of Russian art, literature, and theater, the year when Stanislavsky appointed Vsevolod Meyerhold to create an experimental studio to explore new approaches to acting, when Pavel Gaideburov and his wife founded the Itinerant Theater to bring high culture to the masses. And in 1905 the most popular British playwright on the Russian stage was Jerome K. Jerome. Today remembered chiefly as the author of Three Men in a Boat (Not to Mention the Dog), Jerome was a leading exponent of the so-called New Humor, grounded in irreverence, iconoclasm, and a knowing use of slang. Russians considered him the epitome of British wit, by which they meant a certain poker-faced, understated sense of the absurd. He is even quoted in Chekhov's Seagull. Jerome plays a great deal with many of the same social concerns as do

Journal

SHAW The Annual of Bernard Shaw StudiesPenn State University Press

Published: Oct 22, 2007

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