Mimesis and 興Xing: Two Modes of Viewing Reality Comparing English and Chinese Poetry

Mimesis and 興Xing: Two Modes of Viewing Reality Comparing English and Chinese Poetry MIMESIS AND XING, TWO MODES OF VIEWING REALITY: COMPARING ENGLISH AND CHINESE POETRY Cecile Chu-chin Sun Introduction If I were asked to single out the most significant and radical distinction between English and Chinese poetry, I would say that it is the dominance xing in the other. By mimesis, I of mimesis in one tradition and that of do not mean any particular strain of mimesis as developed in the West, nor any narrow definitions of aesthetic representation associated with the term. Instead, I am referring to a mode of conceptualizing reality in terms of a hierarchical way of thinking with its distinct anthropocentric privileging of human beings over external nature, a concept which is deeply rooted in Western metaphysical thinking. In English poetry, one way of tracing this mimetic mode of thinking is through the metaphorical relationship between "tenor" and "vehicle."1 Xing (lit., evocation), is not merely a poetic device to evoke feeling in the poem through reference to external reality in Chinese poetry. Rather, in its extended dimension, xing represents a lyrical energy that informs Chinese poetry predicated on a cultural orientation in which everything in reality, including human beings, is perceived holistically and as organically http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Comparative Literature Studies Penn State University Press

Mimesis and 興Xing: Two Modes of Viewing Reality Comparing English and Chinese Poetry

Comparative Literature Studies, Volume 43 (3) – Jan 25, 2006

Loading next page...
 
/lp/penn-state-university-press/mimesis-and-xing-two-modes-of-viewing-reality-comparing-english-and-iC0eZrHmV4
Publisher
Penn State University Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2006 by The Pennsylvania State University.
ISSN
1528-4212
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

MIMESIS AND XING, TWO MODES OF VIEWING REALITY: COMPARING ENGLISH AND CHINESE POETRY Cecile Chu-chin Sun Introduction If I were asked to single out the most significant and radical distinction between English and Chinese poetry, I would say that it is the dominance xing in the other. By mimesis, I of mimesis in one tradition and that of do not mean any particular strain of mimesis as developed in the West, nor any narrow definitions of aesthetic representation associated with the term. Instead, I am referring to a mode of conceptualizing reality in terms of a hierarchical way of thinking with its distinct anthropocentric privileging of human beings over external nature, a concept which is deeply rooted in Western metaphysical thinking. In English poetry, one way of tracing this mimetic mode of thinking is through the metaphorical relationship between "tenor" and "vehicle."1 Xing (lit., evocation), is not merely a poetic device to evoke feeling in the poem through reference to external reality in Chinese poetry. Rather, in its extended dimension, xing represents a lyrical energy that informs Chinese poetry predicated on a cultural orientation in which everything in reality, including human beings, is perceived holistically and as organically

Journal

Comparative Literature StudiesPenn State University Press

Published: Jan 25, 2006

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off