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Medieval English Manuscripts: Form, Aesthetics, and the Literary Text

Medieval English Manuscripts: Form, Aesthetics, and the Literary Text Medieval English Manuscripts: Form, Aesthetics, and the Literary Text The essays in this issue of have been gathered together in response to recent work in literary studies on form, aesthetics, and the place of the "literary" in critical theory and literary criticism.1 They are meant to address a question that has been important to work on medieval English manuscripts for some time, especially those bearing literary texts: what is the relationship between the study of medieval books and the study of medieval literature?2 We suggest that this question deserves new attention from a variety of perspectives in light of the "aesthetic turn" that has recently been taken in the wider field of literary research. In their introduction to a special issue of PMLA devoted to "The History of the Book and the Idea of Literature," Leah Price and Seth Lerer describe a scholarly impasse between critical and literary theory, on the one hand, Thank you to the anonymous Chaucer Review reviewers for helpful suggestions, and also to Michael Raby for assistance. Several of the essays in this special issue were first presented in 2009 at the University of Toronto's annual Conference on Editorial Problems: our thanks to St. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Chaucer Review Penn State University Press

Medieval English Manuscripts: Form, Aesthetics, and the Literary Text

The Chaucer Review , Volume 47 (4) – Apr 5, 2013

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Publisher
Penn State University Press
Copyright
Copyright © The Pennsylvania State University.
ISSN
1528-4204
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Abstract

Medieval English Manuscripts: Form, Aesthetics, and the Literary Text The essays in this issue of have been gathered together in response to recent work in literary studies on form, aesthetics, and the place of the "literary" in critical theory and literary criticism.1 They are meant to address a question that has been important to work on medieval English manuscripts for some time, especially those bearing literary texts: what is the relationship between the study of medieval books and the study of medieval literature?2 We suggest that this question deserves new attention from a variety of perspectives in light of the "aesthetic turn" that has recently been taken in the wider field of literary research. In their introduction to a special issue of PMLA devoted to "The History of the Book and the Idea of Literature," Leah Price and Seth Lerer describe a scholarly impasse between critical and literary theory, on the one hand, Thank you to the anonymous Chaucer Review reviewers for helpful suggestions, and also to Michael Raby for assistance. Several of the essays in this special issue were first presented in 2009 at the University of Toronto's annual Conference on Editorial Problems: our thanks to St.

Journal

The Chaucer ReviewPenn State University Press

Published: Apr 5, 2013

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