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Machiavellian Democracy in the Good Society

Machiavellian Democracy in the Good Society j oh n p. m c c or m i c k I thank the editors of The Good Society, and Jeremy Janow, particularly, for organizing last issue's symposium1 on Machiavellian Democracy.2 The participants exceeded my highest aspirations for what the most intelligent and informed reviewers might take away from the book. An author could not wish for commentators to apprehend with greater perspicacity, and reproduced with comparable fidelity, their book's arguments and aims. I am especially flattered by the genuine enthusiasm and excitement that they expressed for the project throughout their remarks--even in the most critical passages. In particular, Arlene Saxonhouse `got' what I was up to. She understands precisely the stakes raised by my enlistment of Machiavelli in a frontal assault on the unreflective and deleterious equation of elections with democracy today. Moreover, despite her self-professed Socratic affinities,3 she faithfully captures the Machiavellian spirit that I'd hoped my book would exude. Saxonhouse admirably and deftly combines the mischievous playfulness and deathly seriousness of the Florentine's political writings. As for the other commentators, I'll respond first to those who are primarily interested in contemporary institutional reform and then to those focused more generally on the principles and http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Good Society Penn State University Press

Machiavellian Democracy in the Good Society

The Good Society , Volume 21 (1) – Jul 25, 2012

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Publisher
Penn State University Press
Copyright
Copyright © The Pennsylvania State University.
ISSN
1538-9731
Publisher site
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Abstract

j oh n p. m c c or m i c k I thank the editors of The Good Society, and Jeremy Janow, particularly, for organizing last issue's symposium1 on Machiavellian Democracy.2 The participants exceeded my highest aspirations for what the most intelligent and informed reviewers might take away from the book. An author could not wish for commentators to apprehend with greater perspicacity, and reproduced with comparable fidelity, their book's arguments and aims. I am especially flattered by the genuine enthusiasm and excitement that they expressed for the project throughout their remarks--even in the most critical passages. In particular, Arlene Saxonhouse `got' what I was up to. She understands precisely the stakes raised by my enlistment of Machiavelli in a frontal assault on the unreflective and deleterious equation of elections with democracy today. Moreover, despite her self-professed Socratic affinities,3 she faithfully captures the Machiavellian spirit that I'd hoped my book would exude. Saxonhouse admirably and deftly combines the mischievous playfulness and deathly seriousness of the Florentine's political writings. As for the other commentators, I'll respond first to those who are primarily interested in contemporary institutional reform and then to those focused more generally on the principles and

Journal

The Good SocietyPenn State University Press

Published: Jul 25, 2012

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