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Labour Standards for a Fair Globalization for Workers of the World

Labour Standards for a Fair Globalization for Workers of the World Anil Verma Gail Elman Introduction Recent developments in globalization have highlighted our failure to reach a global consensus on the fundamental questions for a just and fair globalization for workers.1 Finding justice for workers in a globalizing world raises many questions. Should there be international standards for conditions of work? What form and content should international labour standards have? Whose mandate should international labour standards fall under? And, how should compliance and non-compliance with international standards be monitored and remedied or penalized? There is no general model for international labour standards. Currently, countless initiatives, implemented by various actors, seek to address the problem. Further, new frameworks are constantly being proposed and debated. While some models are working better than others, we are still not close to a long-term solution.2 Current approaches to labour protection result from workers, employers or governments negotiating together, or where that is not feasible, acting unilaterally. The "go it alone" strategy not only severely limits one's capacity to monitor and enforce labour standards, but it also puts into question the legitimacy of the entire model. Furthermore, politically and economically powerful actors are able to impose their models on others without regard to the rights http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Good Society Penn State University Press

Labour Standards for a Fair Globalization for Workers of the World

The Good Society , Volume 16 (2) – Jul 23, 2008

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Publisher
Penn State University Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 The Pennsylvania State University
ISSN
1538-9731
Publisher site
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Abstract

Anil Verma Gail Elman Introduction Recent developments in globalization have highlighted our failure to reach a global consensus on the fundamental questions for a just and fair globalization for workers.1 Finding justice for workers in a globalizing world raises many questions. Should there be international standards for conditions of work? What form and content should international labour standards have? Whose mandate should international labour standards fall under? And, how should compliance and non-compliance with international standards be monitored and remedied or penalized? There is no general model for international labour standards. Currently, countless initiatives, implemented by various actors, seek to address the problem. Further, new frameworks are constantly being proposed and debated. While some models are working better than others, we are still not close to a long-term solution.2 Current approaches to labour protection result from workers, employers or governments negotiating together, or where that is not feasible, acting unilaterally. The "go it alone" strategy not only severely limits one's capacity to monitor and enforce labour standards, but it also puts into question the legitimacy of the entire model. Furthermore, politically and economically powerful actors are able to impose their models on others without regard to the rights

Journal

The Good SocietyPenn State University Press

Published: Jul 23, 2008

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