Introduction

Introduction Michel W. Pharand The fifteen articles collected in this issue of the SHAW Annual are comprised of two groups: those focusing on a single Shaw play and those dealing with broader issues in a number of his plays and critical writings. We begin with an account of how the text of Pygmalion was transformed from its first publication in 1916 into two revised editions. Derek McGovern uncovers the extent to which Shaw's 1939 ending "succeeds in discouraging romantic expectations with regard to the relationship between Higgins and Eliza," and how Shaw's inclusion in Penguin's 1941 "screen edition" of selected scenes from his screenplay "affect his original stage text and encourage the expectation of an Eliza-Freddy marriage." Then, to highlight the numerous parallels between Shakespeare's plays and You Never Can Tell, Shaw's "first romantic comedy," Tony Stafford explores the similarities between the playwrights' use of coincidence, familial situations, comic characters, strong women, and celebratory dénouement-- evidence not only of Shaw's familiarity with Shakespeare but of Shaw's "deep admiration" for him. In comparing the structure and characterization of Widowers' Houses with those of Richard Wagner's opera Das Rheingold, Hisashi Morikawa draws many parallels between Shaw's and Wagner's characters. After considering http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png SHAW The Annual of Bernard Shaw Studies Penn State University Press

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Publisher
Penn State University Press
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Copyright © Penn State University Press
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1529-1480
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Abstract

Michel W. Pharand The fifteen articles collected in this issue of the SHAW Annual are comprised of two groups: those focusing on a single Shaw play and those dealing with broader issues in a number of his plays and critical writings. We begin with an account of how the text of Pygmalion was transformed from its first publication in 1916 into two revised editions. Derek McGovern uncovers the extent to which Shaw's 1939 ending "succeeds in discouraging romantic expectations with regard to the relationship between Higgins and Eliza," and how Shaw's inclusion in Penguin's 1941 "screen edition" of selected scenes from his screenplay "affect his original stage text and encourage the expectation of an Eliza-Freddy marriage." Then, to highlight the numerous parallels between Shakespeare's plays and You Never Can Tell, Shaw's "first romantic comedy," Tony Stafford explores the similarities between the playwrights' use of coincidence, familial situations, comic characters, strong women, and celebratory dénouement-- evidence not only of Shaw's familiarity with Shakespeare but of Shaw's "deep admiration" for him. In comparing the structure and characterization of Widowers' Houses with those of Richard Wagner's opera Das Rheingold, Hisashi Morikawa draws many parallels between Shaw's and Wagner's characters. After considering

Journal

SHAW The Annual of Bernard Shaw StudiesPenn State University Press

Published: Sep 11, 2011

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