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Introduction: The “Preposterous Contemporary Jacobean”: Adaptations in Film and Theater, Responses to Pascale Aebischer

Introduction: The “Preposterous Contemporary Jacobean”: Adaptations in Film and Theater,... Introduction The “Preposterous Contemporary Jacobean”: Adaptations in Film and Theater, Responses to Pascale Aebischer elizabeth kelley bowman University of Guam Pascale Aebischer was among the first scholars to address Mike Figgis’s adaptation, in the film Hot , o el f John Webster’s play e D Th uchess of Malfi. Aebischer proposed an understanding of the “presposterous” contempo- rary Jacobean film or play text, a “countercinematic” Warburgian N achleben (aer ft life) or adaptation as “cultural cannibalism”: anachronistic, narrato- logically disjointed, and irreverent. e e Th arly moderns’ anxiety over textual legacy and influence, the mon- uments and architecture of history, was refracted by late twentieth- and early twenty-first-century directors into Aebischer’s “preposterous con- temporary Jacobean,” a series of works like , Ed How tea l rd II, e R Th evengers Tragedy, and Coriolanus, that challenge and complicate the reception of Shakespearean or Websterian work. This category of the preposterous stands in contrast to works such as Shakespeare in or Lov Aenonymous (2011), a Da Vinci Code-style flowering of sentimentalism, conservatism, conspiracy theories, and contempt for scholarly accuracy. But there are other categories besides that binary. Brigitte Maria Mayer’s film installation of her late husband Heinrich Muller’s play Anatomie http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Interdisciplinary Literary Studies Penn State University Press

Introduction: The “Preposterous Contemporary Jacobean”: Adaptations in Film and Theater, Responses to Pascale Aebischer

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Publisher
Penn State University Press
Copyright
Copyright © The Pennsylvania State University.
ISSN
2161-427X

Abstract

Introduction The “Preposterous Contemporary Jacobean”: Adaptations in Film and Theater, Responses to Pascale Aebischer elizabeth kelley bowman University of Guam Pascale Aebischer was among the first scholars to address Mike Figgis’s adaptation, in the film Hot , o el f John Webster’s play e D Th uchess of Malfi. Aebischer proposed an understanding of the “presposterous” contempo- rary Jacobean film or play text, a “countercinematic” Warburgian N achleben (aer ft life) or adaptation as “cultural cannibalism”: anachronistic, narrato- logically disjointed, and irreverent. e e Th arly moderns’ anxiety over textual legacy and influence, the mon- uments and architecture of history, was refracted by late twentieth- and early twenty-first-century directors into Aebischer’s “preposterous con- temporary Jacobean,” a series of works like , Ed How tea l rd II, e R Th evengers Tragedy, and Coriolanus, that challenge and complicate the reception of Shakespearean or Websterian work. This category of the preposterous stands in contrast to works such as Shakespeare in or Lov Aenonymous (2011), a Da Vinci Code-style flowering of sentimentalism, conservatism, conspiracy theories, and contempt for scholarly accuracy. But there are other categories besides that binary. Brigitte Maria Mayer’s film installation of her late husband Heinrich Muller’s play Anatomie

Journal

Interdisciplinary Literary StudiesPenn State University Press

Published: Sep 1, 2015

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