Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Introduction

Introduction Introduction HUGO HALFERTY DROCHON he essays published in this issue were first presented at a conference organized at the Centre for Research in the Arts, Social Sciences, and Humanities (CRASSH), Cambridge, on November 21, 2008, entitled "Nietzsche's Transvaluation of Values."1 The conference's project was to reexamine Nietzsche's Umwerthung aller Werthe project, which has been discredited by Nietzsche's sister's and Peter Gast's fraudulent editions of The Will to Power. As will be clear from the issue, even the choice of how to translate `Umwerthung' into English--as either `revaluation' or `transvaluation'--was an issue of contention from the start. Many authors in fact switched from one to the other between the conference itself and the publication of the articles.2 In view of this, Duncan Large's "Philologica" discussion of the merits and demerits of translating `Umwerthung' as either `revaluation' or `transvaluation' opens the issue. This is followed by Thomas Brobjer's historical exploration of the origin of the "revaluation" theme in Nietzsche's thought, which he dates in the notes of 1880­81, much earlier than most other commentators. Manuel Dries attempts to think through the conditions that must be satisfied for Nietzsche's "transvaluation" project to be successful, arguing that it is not simply an http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of Nietzsche Studies Penn State University Press

Loading next page...
 
/lp/penn-state-university-press/introduction-pWLzuUydg2
Publisher
Penn State University Press
Copyright
Copyright © Penn State University Press
ISSN
1538-4594
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Introduction HUGO HALFERTY DROCHON he essays published in this issue were first presented at a conference organized at the Centre for Research in the Arts, Social Sciences, and Humanities (CRASSH), Cambridge, on November 21, 2008, entitled "Nietzsche's Transvaluation of Values."1 The conference's project was to reexamine Nietzsche's Umwerthung aller Werthe project, which has been discredited by Nietzsche's sister's and Peter Gast's fraudulent editions of The Will to Power. As will be clear from the issue, even the choice of how to translate `Umwerthung' into English--as either `revaluation' or `transvaluation'--was an issue of contention from the start. Many authors in fact switched from one to the other between the conference itself and the publication of the articles.2 In view of this, Duncan Large's "Philologica" discussion of the merits and demerits of translating `Umwerthung' as either `revaluation' or `transvaluation' opens the issue. This is followed by Thomas Brobjer's historical exploration of the origin of the "revaluation" theme in Nietzsche's thought, which he dates in the notes of 1880­81, much earlier than most other commentators. Manuel Dries attempts to think through the conditions that must be satisfied for Nietzsche's "transvaluation" project to be successful, arguing that it is not simply an

Journal

The Journal of Nietzsche StudiesPenn State University Press

Published: May 30, 2010

There are no references for this article.