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Introduction

Introduction Jossianna Arroyo and Elizabeth A. Marchant This volume addresses a gap in discussions of transatlantic racial formations and cultural expressions. A rich body of work has emerged in the two decades since the publication of sociologist Paul Gilroy's The Black Atlantic: Modernity and Double Consciousness, in which he advances the idea that "cultural historians could take the Atlantic as one single, complex unit of analysis in their discussions of the modern world and use it to produce an explicitly transnational and intercultural perspective."1 Defining the black Atlantic as a cultural formation, he points to "intellectuals and activists, writers, speakers, poets, and artists" who articulate the desire to transcend both "the structures of the nation state and the constraints of ethnicity and national particularity" (19). Looking to shift the discussion of black culture beyond a binary opposition between the national and the diasporic, he attempts to put them in dialogue (29). Some scholars have called for the broad application of Gilroy's theoretical framework to analyses of regions beyond the scope of his original study. Others have explored what they see as the limitations of his postnational viewpoint. Critics have also suggested that his book privileges male intellectuals from Europe http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Comparative Literature Studies Penn State University Press

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Publisher
Penn State University Press
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Copyright © The Pennsylvania State University.
ISSN
1528-4212
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Abstract

Jossianna Arroyo and Elizabeth A. Marchant This volume addresses a gap in discussions of transatlantic racial formations and cultural expressions. A rich body of work has emerged in the two decades since the publication of sociologist Paul Gilroy's The Black Atlantic: Modernity and Double Consciousness, in which he advances the idea that "cultural historians could take the Atlantic as one single, complex unit of analysis in their discussions of the modern world and use it to produce an explicitly transnational and intercultural perspective."1 Defining the black Atlantic as a cultural formation, he points to "intellectuals and activists, writers, speakers, poets, and artists" who articulate the desire to transcend both "the structures of the nation state and the constraints of ethnicity and national particularity" (19). Looking to shift the discussion of black culture beyond a binary opposition between the national and the diasporic, he attempts to put them in dialogue (29). Some scholars have called for the broad application of Gilroy's theoretical framework to analyses of regions beyond the scope of his original study. Others have explored what they see as the limitations of his postnational viewpoint. Critics have also suggested that his book privileges male intellectuals from Europe

Journal

Comparative Literature StudiesPenn State University Press

Published: May 10, 2012

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