Ice Cream U: The Story of the Nation's Most Successful Collegiate Creamery (review)

Ice Cream U: The Story of the Nation's Most Successful Collegiate Creamery (review) book reviews labor law in Pennsylvania which created a loophole, the "glass house exception" for a continuation of night work among young laborers, even while it also banned the practice among other industrial enterprises in the state. Thus, glassbottle plants in Pittsburgh had an exception to children working at night that almost no other industry enjoyed, one which the exploited for a decade. The 1905 law led to ten years of bitter legislative debate, until the exemption was finally excluded in the child labor bill of 1915. As a result, Flannery argues that progressive reform was stymied for nearly 10 years, not because of any single cause or interest, but out of a unique set of circumstances combining the interests of those opposed to reform: manufacturers, the boys and their families, and workers and their union, each opposed to reform for their own reasons. Flannery's The Glass House Boys of Pittsburgh is a detailed, well-organized narrative of long neglected topic of social history. Along with the recently published Glass Towns: Industry, Labor, and Political Economy in Appalachia, 1890­1930s by Ken Fones-Wolf (University of Illinois Press, 2007), this work will shed more light on the struggles of glass workers http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Pennsylvania History: A Journal of Mid-Atlantic Studies Penn State University Press

Ice Cream U: The Story of the Nation's Most Successful Collegiate Creamery (review)

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Publisher
Penn State University Press
Copyright
Copyright © Penn State University Press
ISSN
2153-2109
Publisher site
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Abstract

book reviews labor law in Pennsylvania which created a loophole, the "glass house exception" for a continuation of night work among young laborers, even while it also banned the practice among other industrial enterprises in the state. Thus, glassbottle plants in Pittsburgh had an exception to children working at night that almost no other industry enjoyed, one which the exploited for a decade. The 1905 law led to ten years of bitter legislative debate, until the exemption was finally excluded in the child labor bill of 1915. As a result, Flannery argues that progressive reform was stymied for nearly 10 years, not because of any single cause or interest, but out of a unique set of circumstances combining the interests of those opposed to reform: manufacturers, the boys and their families, and workers and their union, each opposed to reform for their own reasons. Flannery's The Glass House Boys of Pittsburgh is a detailed, well-organized narrative of long neglected topic of social history. Along with the recently published Glass Towns: Industry, Labor, and Political Economy in Appalachia, 1890­1930s by Ken Fones-Wolf (University of Illinois Press, 2007), this work will shed more light on the struggles of glass workers

Journal

Pennsylvania History: A Journal of Mid-Atlantic StudiesPenn State University Press

Published: Nov 3, 2010

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