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Nietzsche's Constructivism: A Metaphysics of Material Objects by Justin Remhof (review)

Nietzsche's Constructivism: A Metaphysics of Material Objects by Justin Remhof (review) BOOK REVIEWS | 179 “order of rank.” In the new conception, by contrast, every human being has equal worth, so that no more is due to one than to another: justice is egal- itarian. How, exactly, does ressentiment take us from the one to the other? In chapter 7, Elgat attempts to develop a vindicating genealogy of the alternative conception of justice Nietzsche favors. However, the textual resources Elgat exploits to start this account discuss the emergence of the prudential concept of justice discussed above, and so are not obviously well-suited to account for the development of a non-prudential alternative to “moral justice.” In addition, the very project of a vindicating genealogy of justice raises the general question of how genealogy can be normative at all. Elgat says relatively little about this. He essentially argues that the critical import of genealogy is epistemic: if the belief in “moral justice” grew out of ressentiment, then it does not merit our confidence because ressentiment is not an epistemically reliable mechanism of belief formation (3). There are two problems with this approach: first, it depends on the historical accu- racy of the genealogy, but Nietzsche oer ff s little solid historical evidence http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of Nietzsche Studies Penn State University Press

Nietzsche's Constructivism: A Metaphysics of Material Objects by Justin Remhof (review)

The Journal of Nietzsche Studies , Volume 50 (1) – Apr 5, 2019

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Publisher
Penn State University Press
Copyright
Copyright © The Pennsylvania State University.
ISSN
1538-4594

Abstract

BOOK REVIEWS | 179 “order of rank.” In the new conception, by contrast, every human being has equal worth, so that no more is due to one than to another: justice is egal- itarian. How, exactly, does ressentiment take us from the one to the other? In chapter 7, Elgat attempts to develop a vindicating genealogy of the alternative conception of justice Nietzsche favors. However, the textual resources Elgat exploits to start this account discuss the emergence of the prudential concept of justice discussed above, and so are not obviously well-suited to account for the development of a non-prudential alternative to “moral justice.” In addition, the very project of a vindicating genealogy of justice raises the general question of how genealogy can be normative at all. Elgat says relatively little about this. He essentially argues that the critical import of genealogy is epistemic: if the belief in “moral justice” grew out of ressentiment, then it does not merit our confidence because ressentiment is not an epistemically reliable mechanism of belief formation (3). There are two problems with this approach: first, it depends on the historical accu- racy of the genealogy, but Nietzsche oer ff s little solid historical evidence

Journal

The Journal of Nietzsche StudiesPenn State University Press

Published: Apr 5, 2019

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