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Diet and the Disease of Civilization by Adrienne Rose Bitar (review)

Diet and the Disease of Civilization by Adrienne Rose Bitar (review) Book Reviews In the concluding afterword Zsolt Czigányik succinctly identifies the key leitmotifs underlying the thematically diverse contributions and suggests that jointly they go some way toward bridging the gap between the literary, practical, and theoretical aspects of utopianism. At this point it could be observed that such an attempt at interdisciplinary studies of utopias and utopianism should always take into account the methodological postulate formulated by Russian Formalist Boris Eikhenbaum: “Literature, like any other specific order of things, is not generated from facts belonging to other orders and therefore cannot be reduced to such facts. The relations between the facts of the literary order and facts extrinsic to it cannot simply be causal relations but can only be the rela- tions of correspondence, interaction, dependency, or conditionality.” Utopian Horizons constitutes an interesting and valuable contribution to utopian studies, the more so as some contributors focus on various manifes- tations of utopianism in the Hungarian context, virtually unknown to most Western scholars. The book as a whole is highly informative, insightful, and accessible, avoiding the excesses of theoretical and quasi-theoretical jargon, which radically expands its potential readership. Note 1. Boris Eikhenbaum, “Literary Environment,” in Readings in Russian Poetics: Formalist http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Utopian Studies Penn State University Press

Diet and the Disease of Civilization by Adrienne Rose Bitar (review)

Utopian Studies , Volume 29 (2) – Jul 11, 2018

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Publisher
Penn State University Press
Copyright
Copyright © Society for Utopian Studies
ISSN
2154-9648

Abstract

Book Reviews In the concluding afterword Zsolt Czigányik succinctly identifies the key leitmotifs underlying the thematically diverse contributions and suggests that jointly they go some way toward bridging the gap between the literary, practical, and theoretical aspects of utopianism. At this point it could be observed that such an attempt at interdisciplinary studies of utopias and utopianism should always take into account the methodological postulate formulated by Russian Formalist Boris Eikhenbaum: “Literature, like any other specific order of things, is not generated from facts belonging to other orders and therefore cannot be reduced to such facts. The relations between the facts of the literary order and facts extrinsic to it cannot simply be causal relations but can only be the rela- tions of correspondence, interaction, dependency, or conditionality.” Utopian Horizons constitutes an interesting and valuable contribution to utopian studies, the more so as some contributors focus on various manifes- tations of utopianism in the Hungarian context, virtually unknown to most Western scholars. The book as a whole is highly informative, insightful, and accessible, avoiding the excesses of theoretical and quasi-theoretical jargon, which radically expands its potential readership. Note 1. Boris Eikhenbaum, “Literary Environment,” in Readings in Russian Poetics: Formalist

Journal

Utopian StudiesPenn State University Press

Published: Jul 11, 2018

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