Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Human Rights, Democracy and Care

Human Rights, Democracy and Care SYMPOSIUM Carol C. Gould, Globalizing Democracy and Human Rights (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2004) Joan Tronto Carol Gould's Globalizing Democracy and Human Rights is an ambitious attempt to synthesize many of the disparate directions in which contemporary political theory pursues its concerns about human rights and democracy. Drawing upon her own previous analysis of democracy in Rethinking Democracy, Gould argues that "our increasingly globalized and sometimes terrorized world ... requires a framework in which an expanded vision of democracy and a broadened conception of human rights are essential, and essentially intertwined." (264) There is an essential good sense in this integrative approach, and the breadth and depth of Gould's thoughtful arguments in suggesting the need to combine the pieces of justice, democracy, rights, care, recognition, gender analysis, et. al., are worthy of careful consideration. Gould is one of the few political theorists, for example, to take care seriously as a concept in democratic theory and to try to "integrate" care with concepts such as justice.1 In this commentary I want to consider the ways in which Carol Gould has incorporated the feminist ethic of care into her overall argument, which leads to two basic questions: First, how does http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Good Society Penn State University Press

Human Rights, Democracy and Care

The Good Society , Volume 16 (2) – Jul 23, 2008

Loading next page...
 
/lp/penn-state-university-press/human-rights-democracy-and-care-LYgvkH4tni
Publisher
Penn State University Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 The Pennsylvania State University
ISSN
1538-9731
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

SYMPOSIUM Carol C. Gould, Globalizing Democracy and Human Rights (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2004) Joan Tronto Carol Gould's Globalizing Democracy and Human Rights is an ambitious attempt to synthesize many of the disparate directions in which contemporary political theory pursues its concerns about human rights and democracy. Drawing upon her own previous analysis of democracy in Rethinking Democracy, Gould argues that "our increasingly globalized and sometimes terrorized world ... requires a framework in which an expanded vision of democracy and a broadened conception of human rights are essential, and essentially intertwined." (264) There is an essential good sense in this integrative approach, and the breadth and depth of Gould's thoughtful arguments in suggesting the need to combine the pieces of justice, democracy, rights, care, recognition, gender analysis, et. al., are worthy of careful consideration. Gould is one of the few political theorists, for example, to take care seriously as a concept in democratic theory and to try to "integrate" care with concepts such as justice.1 In this commentary I want to consider the ways in which Carol Gould has incorporated the feminist ethic of care into her overall argument, which leads to two basic questions: First, how does

Journal

The Good SocietyPenn State University Press

Published: Jul 23, 2008

There are no references for this article.