Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

How to Read Nietzsche (review)

How to Read Nietzsche (review) Keith Ansell-Pearson. How to Read Nietzsche. New York: W. W. Norton and Company, 2005. 131 pp. ISBN 0-393-32821-X. Paperback. $11.95. RAINER J. HANSHE AND ALAN ROSENBERG To make the individual uncomfortable, that is my task. --Friedrich Nietzsche, Spring­Summer 1875, 5:[178] Guidebooks on art, literature, and philosophy are an ever-exploding phenomenon; they are read more perhaps than the actual works of whatever figures are being summarized, which is one of their significant if not pernicious dangers. Norton's How to Read series is edited by Simon Critchley, professor of philosophy at the New School for Social Research, and includes books on Shakespeare, Sade, Freud, and most recently Derrida. More perhaps than any other figure in the series, Nietzsche presents the greatest challenge and the hardest questions. Recalling Nietzsche's comments that books written "for all the world are always foul-smelling books" (BGE 30) and that "not only writing but also thinking" (Z:1 "On Reading and Writing") will be corrupted once all learn how to read may have made Ansell-Pearson bristle when writing this volume. In the foreword, Critchley notes that the series is based on a simple but novel idea, which is to ameliorate the dearth of often inadequate secondhand introductory http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of Nietzsche Studies Penn State University Press

How to Read Nietzsche (review)

The Journal of Nietzsche Studies , Volume 35 (1) – Nov 28, 2008

Loading next page...
 
/lp/penn-state-university-press/how-to-read-nietzsche-review-4sALvTYr52
Publisher
Penn State University Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA
ISSN
1538-4594
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Keith Ansell-Pearson. How to Read Nietzsche. New York: W. W. Norton and Company, 2005. 131 pp. ISBN 0-393-32821-X. Paperback. $11.95. RAINER J. HANSHE AND ALAN ROSENBERG To make the individual uncomfortable, that is my task. --Friedrich Nietzsche, Spring­Summer 1875, 5:[178] Guidebooks on art, literature, and philosophy are an ever-exploding phenomenon; they are read more perhaps than the actual works of whatever figures are being summarized, which is one of their significant if not pernicious dangers. Norton's How to Read series is edited by Simon Critchley, professor of philosophy at the New School for Social Research, and includes books on Shakespeare, Sade, Freud, and most recently Derrida. More perhaps than any other figure in the series, Nietzsche presents the greatest challenge and the hardest questions. Recalling Nietzsche's comments that books written "for all the world are always foul-smelling books" (BGE 30) and that "not only writing but also thinking" (Z:1 "On Reading and Writing") will be corrupted once all learn how to read may have made Ansell-Pearson bristle when writing this volume. In the foreword, Critchley notes that the series is based on a simple but novel idea, which is to ameliorate the dearth of often inadequate secondhand introductory

Journal

The Journal of Nietzsche StudiesPenn State University Press

Published: Nov 28, 2008

There are no references for this article.