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How Does the Ascetic Ideal Function in Nietzsche’s Genealogy?

How Does the Ascetic Ideal Function in Nietzsche’s Genealogy? How Does the Ascetic Ideal Function in Nietzsche's Genealogy? t is remarkable that four commentaries on Nietzsche's On the Genealogy of Morals will have been published within the space of one year--a testimony to how prominent the text has become in scholarship and college courses. Recently I had the great pleasure of convening with the other three authors--Dan Conway, Chris Janaway, and David Owen--to share and discuss our work. I can say with confidence that each of these authors has produced a first-rate study, and I am proud to share the stage with them.1 Moreover, there should be little concern about redundancy within this set of commentaries; each is written in a distinctive style, with distinctive interpretations, emphases, and perspectives on Nietzsche's complicated book--yet each with careful and expert attention to the text as written. So there is plenty of room for productive disagreement and cross-fertilization among these commentaries. In my article I will focus on Nietzsche's discussion of the ascetic ideal in GM III.2 In the course of my analysis I will indicate how my approach differs from those of the other three works when appropriate. Each of the other writers does a remarkable job examining this http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of Nietzsche Studies Penn State University Press

How Does the Ascetic Ideal Function in Nietzsche’s Genealogy?

The Journal of Nietzsche Studies , Volume 35 (1) – Nov 28, 2008

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Publisher
Penn State University Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA
ISSN
1538-4594
Publisher site
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Abstract

How Does the Ascetic Ideal Function in Nietzsche's Genealogy? t is remarkable that four commentaries on Nietzsche's On the Genealogy of Morals will have been published within the space of one year--a testimony to how prominent the text has become in scholarship and college courses. Recently I had the great pleasure of convening with the other three authors--Dan Conway, Chris Janaway, and David Owen--to share and discuss our work. I can say with confidence that each of these authors has produced a first-rate study, and I am proud to share the stage with them.1 Moreover, there should be little concern about redundancy within this set of commentaries; each is written in a distinctive style, with distinctive interpretations, emphases, and perspectives on Nietzsche's complicated book--yet each with careful and expert attention to the text as written. So there is plenty of room for productive disagreement and cross-fertilization among these commentaries. In my article I will focus on Nietzsche's discussion of the ascetic ideal in GM III.2 In the course of my analysis I will indicate how my approach differs from those of the other three works when appropriate. Each of the other writers does a remarkable job examining this

Journal

The Journal of Nietzsche StudiesPenn State University Press

Published: Nov 28, 2008

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