Havana Reads the Harlem Renaissance: Langston Hughes, Nicolás Guillén, and the Dialectics of Transnational American Literature

Havana Reads the Harlem Renaissance: Langston Hughes, Nicolás Guillén, and the Dialectics of... a. owen aldridge prize winner 2008­2009 havana reads the harlem renaissance: langston hughes, nicolás guillén, and the dialectics of transnational american literature John Patrick Leary On April 20, 1930, the Cuban journalist Gustavo Urrutia wrote to Langston Hughes in New York to announce the publication of a new set of poems, Motivos de son [Son Motifs], by a young Cuban poet named Nicolás Guillén, whom Hughes had met on his recent trip to Havana. Guillén's poems had just been published in "Ideales de una raza" ["Ideals of a Race"], the weekly black-interest section edited by Urrutia. It ran in the Sunday edition of the conservative Havana daily Diario de la Marina from 1928 until it was withdrawn under political pressure from the national government. As the editor of "Ideales de una raza," Urrutia played a major role in Cuba's afrocubanista (Afro-Cuban) movement. In his letter to the young American poet, Urrutia solicited the American's support and predicted happily that Guillén's Motivos de son would scandalize the local black bourgeoisie with its frank use of the vulgar slang and popular music of urban Cubans of color. Hughes, who had recently returned from a March visit to Cuba covered carefully http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Comparative Literature Studies Penn State University Press

Havana Reads the Harlem Renaissance: Langston Hughes, Nicolás Guillén, and the Dialectics of Transnational American Literature

Comparative Literature Studies, Volume 47 (2) – Sep 29, 2010

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Publisher
Penn State University Press
Copyright
Copyright © Penn State University Press
ISSN
1528-4212
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Abstract

a. owen aldridge prize winner 2008­2009 havana reads the harlem renaissance: langston hughes, nicolás guillén, and the dialectics of transnational american literature John Patrick Leary On April 20, 1930, the Cuban journalist Gustavo Urrutia wrote to Langston Hughes in New York to announce the publication of a new set of poems, Motivos de son [Son Motifs], by a young Cuban poet named Nicolás Guillén, whom Hughes had met on his recent trip to Havana. Guillén's poems had just been published in "Ideales de una raza" ["Ideals of a Race"], the weekly black-interest section edited by Urrutia. It ran in the Sunday edition of the conservative Havana daily Diario de la Marina from 1928 until it was withdrawn under political pressure from the national government. As the editor of "Ideales de una raza," Urrutia played a major role in Cuba's afrocubanista (Afro-Cuban) movement. In his letter to the young American poet, Urrutia solicited the American's support and predicted happily that Guillén's Motivos de son would scandalize the local black bourgeoisie with its frank use of the vulgar slang and popular music of urban Cubans of color. Hughes, who had recently returned from a March visit to Cuba covered carefully

Journal

Comparative Literature StudiesPenn State University Press

Published: Sep 29, 2010

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