Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Guest Editor's Introduction: Nietzsche's Ancient History

Guest Editor's Introduction: Nietzsche's Ancient History Guest Editor's Introduction: Nietzsche's Ancient History Jessica N. Berry ietzsche's reflection "What I Owe to the Ancients" in Twilight of the Idols has served as the touchstone for innumerable discussions in the scholarship on his work and thought. Not surprisingly, given the devotion to and kinship with the Greek philosophers that Nietzsche expressed throughout his productive career, these discussions have tended to focus on the impact of those philosophers (especially Socrates and Plato) on Nietzsche's intellectual development and especially on his mature views. That focus has not been misplaced, of course; one can hardly overestimate Nietzsche's intellectual debt to philosophers in Greek antiquity. But the authors in this issue have been encouraged especially to explore untreated and undertreated topics and to examine from fresh angles topics one might have thought spent. In that spirit, Richard Bett takes up the question to what extent the Romans play a role in Nietzsche's thought and writing. As the scattered and scant textual evidence would suggest, there is little to be said for a systematic influence here. But in Nietzsche's praise of "Rome and its noble and frivolous tolerance" (BGE 46), Bett reveals, on the one hand, an upward trend in Nietzsche's http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of Nietzsche Studies Penn State University Press

Guest Editor's Introduction: Nietzsche's Ancient History

The Journal of Nietzsche Studies , Volume 42 (1) – Nov 4, 2011

Loading next page...
 
/lp/penn-state-university-press/guest-editor-s-introduction-nietzsche-s-ancient-history-gl7ZhaPLOc
Publisher
Penn State University Press
Copyright
Copyright © Penn State University Press
ISSN
1538-4594
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Guest Editor's Introduction: Nietzsche's Ancient History Jessica N. Berry ietzsche's reflection "What I Owe to the Ancients" in Twilight of the Idols has served as the touchstone for innumerable discussions in the scholarship on his work and thought. Not surprisingly, given the devotion to and kinship with the Greek philosophers that Nietzsche expressed throughout his productive career, these discussions have tended to focus on the impact of those philosophers (especially Socrates and Plato) on Nietzsche's intellectual development and especially on his mature views. That focus has not been misplaced, of course; one can hardly overestimate Nietzsche's intellectual debt to philosophers in Greek antiquity. But the authors in this issue have been encouraged especially to explore untreated and undertreated topics and to examine from fresh angles topics one might have thought spent. In that spirit, Richard Bett takes up the question to what extent the Romans play a role in Nietzsche's thought and writing. As the scattered and scant textual evidence would suggest, there is little to be said for a systematic influence here. But in Nietzsche's praise of "Rome and its noble and frivolous tolerance" (BGE 46), Bett reveals, on the one hand, an upward trend in Nietzsche's

Journal

The Journal of Nietzsche StudiesPenn State University Press

Published: Nov 4, 2011

There are no references for this article.