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Getting Published: Grant Richards and the Shaw Book

Getting Published: Grant Richards and the Shaw Book ``I object to publishers: the one service they have done me is to teach me to do without them. They combine commercial rascality with artistic touchiness and pettishness, without being either good businessmen or fine judges of literature. All that is necessary to the production of a book is an author and a bookseller, without any intermediary parasite,'' Shaw wrote to London bookseller and amateur photographer Frederick H. Evans, not after decades of publishing experiences (and presumably woes) but in August 1895.1 Shaw's disdain is understandable. By 1895, his publishing efforts had yielded very little: two novels, Cashel Byron's Profession (1886) and An Unsocial Socialist (1887); two essays in Fabian Essays in Socialism (1889); The Quintessence of Ibsenism (1891); and one play, Widowers' Houses (1893), which sold very few copies. Also discouraging were the two unauthorized U.S. editions of Cashel Byron that appeared in 1886 and two of The Quintessence in 1891 and 1894. Still to come in 1900 were unauthorized U.S. editions of An Unsocial Socialist and Love among the Artists. Shaw may have objected to publishers as incompetent parasites, but the very close ties he maintained with them over the course of his long career were http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png SHAW The Annual of Bernard Shaw Studies Penn State University Press

Getting Published: Grant Richards and the Shaw Book

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Publisher
Penn State University Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2007 The Pennsylvania State University. All rights reserved.
ISSN
1529-1480
Publisher site
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Abstract

``I object to publishers: the one service they have done me is to teach me to do without them. They combine commercial rascality with artistic touchiness and pettishness, without being either good businessmen or fine judges of literature. All that is necessary to the production of a book is an author and a bookseller, without any intermediary parasite,'' Shaw wrote to London bookseller and amateur photographer Frederick H. Evans, not after decades of publishing experiences (and presumably woes) but in August 1895.1 Shaw's disdain is understandable. By 1895, his publishing efforts had yielded very little: two novels, Cashel Byron's Profession (1886) and An Unsocial Socialist (1887); two essays in Fabian Essays in Socialism (1889); The Quintessence of Ibsenism (1891); and one play, Widowers' Houses (1893), which sold very few copies. Also discouraging were the two unauthorized U.S. editions of Cashel Byron that appeared in 1886 and two of The Quintessence in 1891 and 1894. Still to come in 1900 were unauthorized U.S. editions of An Unsocial Socialist and Love among the Artists. Shaw may have objected to publishers as incompetent parasites, but the very close ties he maintained with them over the course of his long career were

Journal

SHAW The Annual of Bernard Shaw StudiesPenn State University Press

Published: Oct 22, 2007

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